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  1. #21
    mjs
    mjs is offline

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    Mar 2005
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    Elkhart, Indiana (USA)
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    My 5x7 pinhole camera is foam core with a plywood bottom. There's a tripod socket in the plywood and the weight of the wood helps keep it stable while the rest, being foam core, makes the whole thing very light. I screwed an old kitchen cabinet handle to one end of the plywood and it's darn near perfect!

    Mike
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming– “Wow! What a Ride!”

    — Hunter S. Thompson

  2. #22
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe VanCleave View Post
    That's a great image. And I like your camera, especially the worn, rugged look of the plywood. I'm assuming your camera's a one-shot affair, where you load paper or film one sheet at a time?

    ~Joe
    Yeah, unfortunately a one shot affair. Ends up being a bummer because if I want to take (lug) the camera anywhere, I only have one shot and then I'm done. The photo that I posted was taken at my school and that building is actually the building the darkroom is in. I'm getting tired of shooting at school though.

    Quote Originally Posted by JudyS
    That's a fantastic image and I love the camera. That knot in the "lens board" just adds all sorts of personality to the box. Congratulations. Do more of those in different focal lengths.
    Thanks! I specifically chose that piece of plywood for the front because it had the knot in it, I like the character it adds. I'll definitely make some more with different focal lengths.

    Quote Originally Posted by mjs
    My 5x7 pinhole camera is foam core with a plywood bottom. There's a tripod socket in the plywood and the weight of the wood helps keep it stable while the rest, being foam core, makes the whole thing very light. I screwed an old kitchen cabinet handle to one end of the plywood and it's darn near perfect!
    Hmm, multiple materials - that's a great idea. I might just have to try that out for my next one. Thanks for the suggestion.

  3. #23
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    Jan 2004
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    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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    Perhaps a large enough changing tent could enable the camera to be reloaded in the field. Depends on the cost of film holders (used) versus a changing tent.

    I built a portable processing box (with arm sleeves) for processing 4x5 paper negatives, something like this could perhaps be adapted for reloading smaller cameras in the field without the expense of film holders, especially given the inexpensiveness of materials when building it by hand.

    I had an idea once for a box camera with storage compartment behind the film plane, accessed by the side of the camera being removable via a lid, with the camera inside a changing tent, where the film at the film plane would be swapped out by one from the rear film compartment, by hand, inside the tent, then the lid reattached. The problem is the changing tent needs to be big enough to permit the film to slide out, without being touched and/or scratched. There's always things about these DIY ideas that remind me why film holders were such a great invention.

    I have successfully built three pinhole cameras that use a falling plate mechanism, where a stack of film plates is at the back of the camera; after the front one is exposed, a lever or knob is slid, and the camera tipped forward, making the front plate fall face-down into the bottom of the box. The two problems with this design are: 1) the focal length has to be longer than the height of the film plate, ruling out wide angle designs; 2) if the box camera is excessively jiggled or tipped upside down the whole mechanism is jammed and quits working.

    ~Joe

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