Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,821   Posts: 1,581,674   Online: 899
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242

    8x10 Pinhole Camera Size

    Hello All,

    First of all just wanted to say thank you to everyone for being so friendly. I've posted a couple threads and have gotten FAST and wonderful responses.

    In my other thread, I asked about 4x5 ortho litho film to use in my pinhole camera in order to make positive enlargements (8x10 or larger). One user suggested that I skip the step of using film and simply use 8x10 paper negatives. I've been using paper negatives for my 4x5 pinhole. This leads me to the dilemma of building a camera that takes an 8x10 sheet of paper. Would there be any way to get around the sheer size and weight (I would probably want to build it out of plywood) of this camera due to the dimensions? Attached are a couple photos of my 4x5 pinhole that I built from plywood. It's quite heavy despite its size. I also attached the dimensions I drew up for the 8x10 camera. The back of it would obviously have to be 8x10 inches. I got it's length and pinhole diameter size from mrpinhole. Anyway, any information or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wood pinhole 1.jpg   wood pinhole 2.jpg   8x10 pinhole dimensions.jpg  

  2. #2
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Size and weight depends entirely on the materials used. Personally, being eccentric as I am, I would just find a shoebox and get to work. It would certainly be interesting enough.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    188
    Ditto. I would say you can easily design a camera that is far lighter. Even view cameras use non-structural bellows. You only need to hold the hole and film plane steady.

  4. #4
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,269
    Images
    67
    How about black Foamcore with some small wooden cleats glued into the inside corners for reinforcement? (I assume this isn't being built for a three month backpacking expedition to the tropics.) I haven't done one that way, but don't see why it couldn't produce a pretty sturdy box.

    It could even be tapered toward the front, but I suspect that would make the joinery pretty tedious.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    830
    f295.org has a whole sub-forum devoted to building pinhole cameras - might want to search/ask there as well.

    Also, jnanian (John) has been making some of these LF box cameras lately in various sizes for sale out of foam core - not specifically pinhole, but a pinhole could be fitted in place of the (basic) lens. The foam core ones he's made are not terribly expensive and include some basic film plane movements - might be worth sending him a PM, even if you don't want to have him make you one, he's a nice guy and generally quite helpful and may be willing to share some construction tips
    i can't wait to take a picture of my thumb with this beautiful camera.

    - phirehouse, after buying a camera in the classifieds

  6. #6
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    As always, thanks for the responses everyone. My first pinhole camera was a shoebox. The only thing I didn't like about it was that I couldn't mount it onto a tripod, it didn't have any weight to it, and it could easily rip, fold, or tear if I dropped it. My plywood 4x5 is nice because it's has weight to it and it feels very stable, not too worried about if I drop it. Like I said though, an 8x10 camera with plywood would be quite heavy. I'll definitely give foamcore a try. Or try to brainstorm on other materials that are study and lightweight at the same time.

  7. #7
    SMBooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, North/West
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,022
    Images
    7
    If you going to incorporate a 8x10 film holder then use wood, something like 6 or 8mm MDF is not that heavy when you use a bit of 3mm MDF on the front. Foamcore is OK but I find its to light and can get blown away in the breeze.

  8. #8
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth View Post
    If you going to incorporate a 8x10 film holder then use wood, something like 6 or 8mm MDF is not that heavy when you use a bit of 3mm MDF on the front. Foamcore is OK but I find its to light and can get blown away in the breeze.
    I doubt I'll be using a film holder. I'll most likely just end up taping the paper onto the back of the camera like I do with my 4x5. I'll look into the MDF though - is that cheaper than plywood? I wouldn't need that much.

  9. #9
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,640
    Images
    152
    Black Ultraboard 3/8 in thick.....like foamcore but with plastic outer skins......with black duct tape at the corners and a wood block at the bottom for the tripod mount. I built a sliding box camera like this that accepts a ground glass and standard holders. It works quite well and I haven't broken it yet....and it I did, it would be easy to fix.

  10. #10
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,230
    Images
    34
    I built an 8x10 out of a holiday popcorn tin(variation on the oatmeal box), it worked better than expected, very light weight and easy to load.I used strip magnets to hold the paper in place.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin