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  1. #11
    eSPhotos's Avatar
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    Thanks all for good informative comments and advices.

    I have taken a few photos yesterday with new 'holes' of varying sizes of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 or there about.
    To me they all produced same blurry un-interested images.
    Maybe I am expecting too much from the pinhole.
    Maybe I need shorter focal length to accentuate distorsions and/or vignettes to make the images interesting.
    I had a good fun building it so don't mind going back to my working shed.
    Any good or interesting focal lengths for 4x5?

  2. #12
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    I used a 65mm and I believe a 45mm, with the 65mm being my preference because it had enough vignette to show the pinhole-ishness well, but wasn't a circle.
    K.S. Klain

  3. #13
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    I just pound a hole and eye-ball it then shoot away and have fun. Putting to much thought into it just ruins it for me.
    Thy heart -- thy heart! -- I wake and sigh,
    And sleep to dream till day
    Of the truth that gold can never buy
    Of the bawbles that it may.

    www.silverhalidephotography.com

  4. #14
    eSPhotos's Avatar
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    cheers guys.
    Liked your philosophy Guitstik. After all, pinhole is to have fun.

    Just done a calc and yes 65mm FL gives good vignette as it's image circle is about 5 inches.
    I might draw up a plan ...

  5. #15
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eSPhotos View Post
    My [4x5 pinhole] camera has a focal length of 155mm
    That's too long a focal length for 4x5. A 150 fl is better suited to 8x10.

    If you made an 8x10 print from your 4x5 negative it would have twice the fuzz of a contact print. So if you started with an 8x10 negative to make an 8x10 print then the fuzz doesn't get magnified.

    Try a 65mm or so focal length.

    To prevent vignetting the pinhole must be very thin. The real reason for the dimple and sand technique is to produce a pinhole with a razor edge to it. Don't use a needle of the size of the pinhole - use one that is considerably larger. You don't make the hole by pushing the needle through but by using the tip of a much larger needle to make a nice dimple.

    You can examine and measure the pinhole by putting it in the enlarger's negative stage and looking at a 10x blow-up.

    After the hole is almost, but not quite, big enough with sanding use just the tip of a smaller needle (one still larger than the hole) to burnish the hole to the right size.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  6. #16
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eSPhotos View Post
    . . . Maybe I need shorter focal length to accentuate distorsions and/or vignettes to make the images interesting. . . .
    Yes. Blur is directly proportional to the diameter of a correctly sized pinhole. Therefore, you can get sharper photos if desired with shorter focal lengths. Extreme wide angle lenses are expensive, but pinholes of all focal lengths cost the same. The apparent distortion inherent in wide angle photography is a valuable tool. National Geographic often uses it.

  7. #17

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    For those looking for accurate size drills for pin holes, round dental burs come in .3mm increasing by tenths of a mm up to 2.7mm.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  8. #18

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    I like to use aluminium foil that's about twice as thick as the usual stuff for kitchen use, but still far thinner than a coke can. I get it from some packaging, but hardware stores could have something similar. Just put it on a relatively soft surface (piece of cardboard), and use a thin sewing needle to drill a hole by holding it between thumb and middle finger and resting the index finger on top (no pressure, the weight alone is enough!). Finally, I just turn it around, drill again from the other side and sand both sides very carefully. Depending on the drilling time, pressure and needle size, I can get almost perfectly round holes from 0,15mm to 0,6mm almost every time.

    And please don't worry too much about the pinhole size and shape. 0,56mm might be the optimum for your focal lenght, but you'd also get a (less sharp) picture with any other size of hole. 50% more or less don't matter much at all. I tend to use a size, that gives me a usable aperture around f/150-200, not necessarily the "optimum size". Same for the perfectly round shape... sure, it gives the sharpest pictures, but a few microscopic pieces of metal won't make your pinhole unusable. Pinhole cameras are very simple devices - no need to over-engineer it.

    ...and that "blurry and uninteresting" is part of pinhole photography. You just can't get the same shaprness as with a lens. And just like any other camera (or tool in general), a pinhole camera needs some skill and experience to use properly and get interesting results. An ultra-wideangle can help with this, as it gives perspectives, that are usually not possible in lens-based photography. I love my tiny matchbox pinhole cameras for 35mm film... they're even less sharp than any 4x5, but I came to like the effect. Just remember that this is not "normal" photography, it's a completely different kind of taking a photo.
    Last edited by moki; 04-18-2011 at 11:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19
    aaronmichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eSPhotos View Post
    Thanks all for good informative comments and advices.

    I have taken a few photos yesterday with new 'holes' of varying sizes of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 or there about.
    To me they all produced same blurry un-interested images.
    Maybe I am expecting too much from the pinhole.
    Maybe I need shorter focal length to accentuate distorsions and/or vignettes to make the images interesting.
    I had a good fun building it so don't mind going back to my working shed.
    Any good or interesting focal lengths for 4x5?
    Like some of the other folks on here said, try changing your focal length and if that doesn't work then I'd try making some more precise pinholes. Personally, I was AMAZED when I started using my home made pinhole's. I could not believe how ridiculously sharp they were for being home made. I make my pinholes with sanded down aluminum from soda cans and sewing needles. Anyway, that's why I found your "blurry and uninteresting" comment a little strange - because if I can do it, anyone can Try checking out http://mrpinhole.com/ if you haven't already. The site is nice because it will tell you how long your focal length has to be in order to cover a certain size (like 4x5 or 8x10).

  10. #20
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    As far as "uninteresting" goes, I think some attention to subject matter can help too. The infinite depth of field and often wider than usual field of view can enhance results with relatively simple and dramatic compositions as opposed to "busy" detailed landscapes. I tend to look for things like "infrastructure" -- bridges, railroads, industrial buildings, dams, large power or pumping stations (all the stuff that results in phone calls to Homeland Security! )

    My 2¢,

    DaveT

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