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  1. #11

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    Jun 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by moki View Post
    Cyanotypes might be an idea, though, with their relatively low sensitivity and easy processing. I haven't done them myself, so others will know a lot more.
    not much to know
    just make photograms in the sun
    with found objects, pieces of plants, feathers
    paper clips anything really ... the paper will have
    a whitish sheen when it is done ( can't really over cook a cyanotype i have been told )
    then wash it in running water, and it turns blue ... not much skill is needed
    as long as you don't try to do your project on an overcast drizzly grey day through a window ( as i did ) you will be fine

    i will be doing them again ( with her class ) on tuesday ..
    i have a feeling the kids will have some fun ...

    good luck !
    john

  2. #12

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    this afternoon i ventured to the school with a film box filled with 5x4 sheets of cyanotype paper.
    the kids went out side with the paper and found tidbits of nature to photogram, the teacher and me too ...
    after about 10-12mins the papers came inside and washed and turned blue.
    the went on the blotter to dry and the kids were VERY excited to have all their work mounted and
    displayed the last weeks of school in the art-showcases.

    it was a piece of cake and a ton of fun !
    john

  3. #13

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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    the kids were VERY excited to have all their work mounted and
    displayed the last weeks of school in the art-showcases.
    Very cool. Can you post some photos of the work?

  4. #14

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    i'd love to, but ... they are at the school ...
    maybe i'll bring a snappy-camera with me
    in a week or so when they are in the showcase ...
    and when i pick my kids up from school i'll take a quick snap ..

    john

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Room Size Pinhole Solution

    Hi,
    I'd like to give you a proposal for your query.
    To be honest I think it is almost an impossible job to get what you ask for, if you want to keep it simple. And I like simple.
    Although there might be a great FUN way of getting what you want in a slightly different way.
    I don't know if you ever heard of Room Size Pinhole Cameras. What this means is that you make of any room a camera obscura, by darkening the windows and hereby the complete room with black plastic and the use of gaffer tape. You shut out the daylight by sticking the black plastic over all the windows that the room in question has. This by itself is a really fun way of getting your kids involved in the most basic way of photography.
    Second step is to determine where to make a hole the size of a quarter in the plastic and most centered in the room so light get as equally divided as possible on the walls, floor and ceiling.
    Shut down the artificial light and wait untill your eyes are adapted to the darkness, and you start seeing the external world appearing on all the surfaces in the room.
    Next you look for the nicest place in the room to make a long exposure photo with either a digital camera or in your case an analogue camera with ordinary film. Good tip is to use ( if you have one ) the digital camera as a reference or check up for the right exposure. Position your camera in the room and shoot the room.
    What your about to get is really amazing, your kids will be trilled !
    Depending on which film you shoot ( b/w in yr case ) develop the film as usual and make these prints afterwards in the dark room with your kids. This way they are witnessing not only the appearing on the photographic paper, but have been really actively involved in this wonderful process. I'm sure they'll love it ! Happy Pinhole Photography !
    Kind regards,
    Luc.

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