Switch to English Language Passer en langue franaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,502   Posts: 1,543,389   Online: 785
      
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    jermaineB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    13

    Noon 612 pinhole

    Wondering if anyone can help me out. I've had this camera for a good month but have yet to take it out to use it. Mainly though its because I don't know the fstop of this camera to calculate my exposure. I'm heading on a trip to SF now and plan to use it. Last place I remember seeing something about an fstop was 205 or whereabouts. Anyone know if that's correct? Greatly appreciate any advice.

  2. #2
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,235
    Images
    65
    (Mein Deutsch ist rusty, but) If it's this camera, it looks as though it's f/207. In my experience, precision and pinhole exposure is a bit of a laugh anyway. Especially if you're using a negative film, err on the side of overexposure, maybe bracket a little, and you're bound to get something. Once you get beyond exposures of five or ten seconds, reciprocity failure becomes quite noticeable on most films, so doubling the length of time does not really double the exposure anyway.

    My 2,

    DaveT

  3. #3
    jermaineB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    13
    Thank you very much! I also found somewhere it was f/214 but I guess it doesn't matter that much.

  4. #4
    hoofed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    York, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1
    The aperture varies from one Noon to another. My Noon 6x12 has an aperture of /207 but Ive seen others with wider and narrow apertures. Most of them appear to be .23.29mm (/207260).

    Each Noon comes with a birth certificate. On one side it has details like the aperture and serial number and on the other side it has a reciprocity failure chart for Ilford FP4. If you dont have the certificate for your Noon I can find my copy and share it with you.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,093
    Quote Originally Posted by hoofed View Post
    The aperture varies from one Noon to another. My Noon 6x12 has an aperture of /207 but Ive seen others with wider and narrow apertures. Most of them appear to be .23.29mm (/207260).

    Each Noon comes with a birth certificate. On one side it has details like the aperture and serial number and on the other side it has a reciprocity failure chart for Ilford FP4. If you dont have the certificate for your Noon I can find my copy and share it with you.
    How about an astrological chart? =)
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,824
    Two things I would like to mention. First, it's never a good idea to take important photographs with a new and unfamilar camera. You really need to take a few rolls of non-critical photos to get the feel of it. Second, even with a fast film exposures are going to be long. This rules out using the camera as a handheld. It also requires you to either use a tripod or to locate appropriate places where it can be placed to make it steady.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Bega N.S.W. Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,308
    Images
    373
    Same as hoofed, I have the same camera, it's great and came with that chart for FP4+. I found that this works really well, and it includes the reciprocity which is important with the long exposures that you will be doing. You just meter for F22 and convert as the supplied chart, quite easy. I have a copy of this chart if you need it.
    BTW, I sometimes load it with Tri-X and place an orange filter over the pinhole in the back of the camera. I then use the FP4 exposure settings.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1

    Noon 6x12 is great pinhole

    I bought a Noon 6x12 pinhole camera from Poland via Ebay some months ago--and with a few modifications, it is now an excellent, unique pinhole camera. The pinhole is .33mm, so the focal length was around F180. Images are a tad fuzzy even for a pinhole, but the light distribution across the frame is probably better for the bigger aperture. In bright day light, exposures are usually between 3 and 4 seconds.

    Initially, the camera was scratching the film, so I polished the two removable slats that frame the film inside the camera. The pinhole was made with a small drill that produced a fine hole, but one with very raised borders both inside and outside of the copper plate (painted black).

    I removed the copper plate and sanded off the raised ridges around the pinhole (on both sides of the copper plate), trying also to thin the metal about the pinhole. As ham-handed as my technique probably was, the fine circumference of the pinhole was still there afterwards. I put the pinhole plate back in (centered as best I could), covered most of the exposed copper with flat black tape and tested the camera with B&W film (Fuji ACROS--least reciprocity of B&W films and great tonal range).

    I also added some soft foam padding held in place with tape beside the take-up spool within the camera--to keep a sustained tension on the exposed film roll. Without it, the spools tend to unravel a little. I was damaging a good portion of my shots with light leaks when trying to get the exposed film from camera to dark storage.

    I also countersunk the 4 holes in the bottom plate so that the plate rests flat on a tripod head. And added a bubble level and wrote the F stop on the top of the camera so as not to get it mixed up with other pinholes I use.

    No more scratched or unraveling film and excellent ligthfall across the whole 6x12 frame (within reason for a pinhole). Images can be sharpened somewhat in Photoshop. I only today finally printed a shot taken recently, printed on 13 x 19 luster paper with an Epson 2200 in B&W setting. Very pleased with printed images (film scanned with Epson 4990). It is surprising--the printed image looks far sharper than pixel peeping of the negative scans would suggest.

    The only draw back for the Noon 6x12 is its size and weight. It looks and feels like a big block toy without wheels. I've taken it to Yellowstone once and with the modifications, mean to take it back for landscapes.

    I also bought a NOON 6x6 and repeated the whole procedure noted above. Although they are sold having a laser pinhole, mine was another microdrill with the raised rim around the pinhole. Sanding off the ridge around the pinhole (again both sides) greatly increase more even light toward image borders and resolution approaching the borders. The 30mm focal length Noon 6x6 produces very sharp images with a .2mm pinhole.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive     Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin