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  1. #41
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshmravi View Post
    Focusing is the biggest difference that is slowing me down. It is not about being hard, it is just that I am never used to this much manual focusing at this range. It takes a lot of practice to get perfect. I manual focus a lot on my Nikon 400mm f/5.6 and at that tele level it is extremly hard to get perfect focus. So I would need few more days before I can say anything for sure.

    Also, there is the feeling of lack of confidence when I look through the rangefinder before I fire it. It is always tempting to reach for my F6.
    Focusing is probably the most different action to get use to. With an SLR, often people focus with their fingers round the top of the lens. With a rangefinder you need to focus with your hand beneath the lens. Stick with it, you will love it when you get the hang of it.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #42

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    I'm very disappointed in all of you. Five pages of discussion on switching from an SLR to a Leica, and no religious flamewars? Y'all are slacking.

    This may be a personal perception, but it seems to me like the general feel of focussing varies betwen different lenses in the RF world much more than it does in the SLR world. Focussing tabs, in particular, make a huge difference (I love them, but there are people who are driven crazy by them). Maybe it's that hand-beneath-the-lens thing; you can't just wrap your hand around the whole lens and manhandle the focussing ring, so you end up with a lighter grip that's more affected by mechanical nuances.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
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    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Focusing is probably the most different action to get use to. With an SLR, often people focus with their fingers round the top of the lens. With a rangefinder you need to focus with your hand beneath the lens. Stick with it, you will love it when you get the hang of it.
    And be thankful you're not thinking of moving to a Contax II or III.

  4. #44
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    Oh, just get a Contax G2 instead! They're fast, quiet, have excellent metering, and lenses that are at least the equal of anything Leica ever made, for a fraction of the price.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshmravi View Post
    Focusing is the biggest difference that is slowing me down. It is not about being hard, it is just that I am never used to this much manual focusing at this range. It takes a lot of practice to get perfect. I manual focus a lot on my Nikon 400mm f/5.6 and at that tele level it is extremly hard to get perfect focus. So I would need few more days before I can say anything for sure.
    When used for street photography with 35mm and wider lenses, aperture 4.0 or 5.6, I use just three positions of the focusing ring in 80-90% of shots - almost infinity, cca 3-4m and approx.1-1.5m. Position of lens is determined by the position of finger lever. The rest is the responsibility of deep of field. When one get used to Leicas focusing ring can be fast as AF.
    Last edited by kapro; 01-24-2012 at 12:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by kapro View Post
    When used for street photography with 35mm and wider lenses, aperture 4.0 or 5.6, I use just three positions of the focusing ring in 80-90% of shots - almost infinity, cca 3-4m and approx.1-1.5m. Position of lens is determined by the position of finger lever. The rest is the responsibility of deep of field. When one get used to Leicas focusing ring can be fast as AF.
    This is sort of what I am doing. I am getting the hang of things now.

    It sure is heck a lot easy to carry around. But you know.... Leica doesn't give a kick like the F6

  7. #47

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    Switch to Leica?

    I was a Nikon SLR user before but when I realize that street photography was really important for me I moved to Leica.

    Dont forget that Leica M is not a big issue for tele lens...maximum 135 mm.

    Good pictures

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakeshmravi View Post
    This is sort of what I am doing. I am getting the hang of things now.

    It sure is heck a lot easy to carry around. But you know.... Leica doesn't give a kick like the F6
    And mirror slap is quite a good way to blur an otherwise attainable shot.

    There's another thing people have totally ignored in this discussion: latency.

    When you click the shutter on a leica, the shutter is opened and the film exposed.

    When you click the shutter on an SLR, the lens stops down to whatever aperture (unless wide-open), while in parallel the mirror shifts out of the way of the light path and the shutter opens to expose the film.

    There are at least two more significant steps happening in an SLR, all due to the cost of WYSIWYG. As a result almost all rangefinders have noticeably lower latency between when you click and when the film is exposed. Modern SLRs are quite good about this, but it's still there.

    I'm not an RF or Leica freak either - I use my F3s religiously for anything significantly wide as viewfinder reality feels more useful with wide-angles and I don't care to use external VFs on RFs.

    Same latency advantage goes to any non-SLR camera: TLRs, 4x5s, etc.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  9. #49
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    And mirror slap is quite a good way to blur an otherwise attainable shot.

    There's another thing people have totally ignored in this discussion: latency.

    When you click the shutter on a leica, the shutter is opened and the film exposed.

    When you click the shutter on an SLR, the lens stops down to whatever aperture (unless wide-open), while in parallel the mirror shifts out of the way of the light path and the shutter opens to expose the film.

    There are at least two more significant steps happening in an SLR, all due to the cost of WYSIWYG. As a result almost all rangefinders have noticeably lower latency between when you click and when the film is exposed. Modern SLRs are quite good about this, but it's still there.

    I'm not an RF or Leica freak either - I use my F3s religiously for anything significantly wide as viewfinder reality feels more useful with wide-angles and I don't care to use external VFs on RFs.

    Same latency advantage goes to any non-SLR camera: TLRs, 4x5s, etc.
    I am interested in this latency effect you quote and wonder if a Leica with a diaphram shutter would give greater latency than one with a focal plane?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    And mirror slap is quite a good way to blur an otherwise attainable shot.

    There's another thing people have totally ignored in this discussion: latency.

    When you click the shutter on a leica, the shutter is opened and the film exposed.

    When you click the shutter on an SLR, the lens stops down to whatever aperture (unless wide-open), while in parallel the mirror shifts out of the way of the light path and the shutter opens to expose the film.

    There are at least two more significant steps happening in an SLR, all due to the cost of WYSIWYG. As a result almost all rangefinders have noticeably lower latency between when you click and when the film is exposed. Modern SLRs are quite good about this, but it's still there.

    I'm not an RF or Leica freak either - I use my F3s religiously for anything significantly wide as viewfinder reality feels more useful with wide-angles and I don't care to use external VFs on RFs.

    Same latency advantage goes to any non-SLR camera: TLRs, 4x5s, etc.

    The latency advantage is so insignificant when compared to the mirror flap vibration. This becomes even more true when you expose for long period of time and when you use a really fast shutter speed (both extremes) (relation with latency and fraction of a second). Again this is assuming you have a camera that is decent in the line of Ds or later Fs. Consider the time to AF a lens vs latency due to apeture. The later vanishes when you consider the latency fractions.



 

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