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  1. #1

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    Rangefinder and filters?

    I'm familiar with the functions of a rangefinder camera, But have yet to use, for example, a polarizing filter on one. How do you know if it's working or not?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    You have to look through and orient it before monting on the lens.
    Adding one or more reference marks to the filter ring can help find the same position after mounting.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  3. #3
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Grab one bigger than lens, rotate to desired setting through your eye, hold it against lens.

    There are push on filters as well, but I havent seen one personally as a polarizer.

  4. #4
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    To quote from a Leica brochure... "The Leica polarizer filter simply pivots 180 degrees to the 12:00 position above the camera. While looking directly through filter, the polarizer is rotated until the desired effect is achieved. Then the polarizer is swung (or pivoted) back to the closed position - which is exactly a 180 degree arc. Now the polarizer filter is front of the lens and doing its job. The simplicity is genius." Here is the link at B&H... Of course, this genius is priced in the Leica tradition $$$
    —Eric

  5. #5
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    I use Rol_Lei Nuts method. Most polarizers have an index mark on the rim that should point towards the sun for maximum effect. Years ago, before reflex cameras were popular, some polarizers had a little lens on an arm that could be used for viewing. Hard to find these used these days, and I don't think there are any new ones being made.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  6. #6
    ROL
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    As mentioned, looking through it is your best bet. Remember to adjust exposure appropriately (usually 1.5 to 2 stops) for the polarizer.

    Quote Originally Posted by bsdunek View Post
    I use Rol_Lei Nuts method. Most polarizers have an index mark on the rim that should point towards the sun for maximum effect.
    Let me add that while useful, this comment taken by itself may be somewhat confusing. This does not mean that the polarizer itself will only work if aimed (on camera) at the sun. In fact, the exact opposite is the case (or perpendicular ). Polarizers are only effective in a range of angles at 90 degrees from the sun. In other words, and you can test this for yourself before ever mounting the polarizer on the camera by looking through the filter and rotating it, the light cannot be polarized effectively when the view is either into the sun or in a broad range 180º opposite of the sun. One time–honored, off–the–cuff, method to deciding whether a polarizer may be used effectively is to hold your hand up with fingers pointing towards the light source (i.e., sun) and outstretched thumb. Your thumb will then point to an approximate direction at which light may be polarized effectively by your filter.

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    It is easier to use Rol_Lei Nut's method if you have two identical polarizers - one to leave on the camera, and one to view through.

    On the plus side, rangefinders are much easier to use with darker filters like deep reds or IR filters, because you don't have to look through the filter to compose or focus.

    The same holds true for TLRs.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Now when it comes to Red/Orange/Yellow/Green filters for black and white shooting... how do SLR users stand the pain of looking through a filter when composing and shooting?

    Sure it reminds you you're using black and white film, but it's a distraction when you know what to expect from the filter and just want to focus on your composition.

    (Trivial point for sure, but the advantage goes to Rangefinders on this issue).

  9. #9
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    As mentioned, looking through it is your best bet. Remember to adjust exposure appropriately (usually 1.5 to 2 stops) for the polarizer.



    Let me add that while useful, this comment taken by itself may be somewhat confusing. This does not mean that the polarizer itself will only work if aimed (on camera) at the sun. In fact, the exact opposite is the case (or perpendicular ). Polarizers are only effective in a range of angles at 90 degrees from the sun. In other words, and you can test this for yourself before ever mounting the polarizer on the camera by looking through the filter and rotating it, the light cannot be polarized effectively when the view is either into the sun or in a broad range 180º opposite of the sun. One time–honored, off–the–cuff, method to deciding whether a polarizer may be used effectively is to hold your hand up with fingers pointing towards the light source (i.e., sun) and outstretched thumb. Your thumb will then point to an approximate direction at which light may be polarized effectively by your filter.
    True. But the index mark on the filters are meant to be aimed at the sun. It can be confusing if the sun is not perpendicular to the lens axis, but one can kind of figure it out. I do look through the filter, but often just use the index mark. I like the suggestion by MattKing to have two filters. I think I will try that out.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  10. #10
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Sure it reminds you you're using black and white film
    But sometimes doesn't remind you that you have just loaded colour film!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.



 

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