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  1. #21

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    If you can use filters, ( I recommend Kodak's #'s 8, 11 & 25A ).

    Quote Originally Posted by thegman View Post
    Ilford XP2 and Kodak BW400CN are great. Basically you've got a very fine grain ISO 400 film, which can handle being shot at ISO 800 too. Processes as normal C41, so you can just take it down the local lab/drug store etc.

    They are very similar films, smooth gradations, and give very nice results in my opinion.
    The Ilford XP2 and Kodak BW400CN films are also less in need of using the B&W contrast filters

    to expand film contrast. The Ilford XP2 seems to be better for landscapes and Kodak's BW 400CN,

    seems to be better for Portraits, due to it's lower apparent grain, than Ilford's XP2.

    If you can use filters, ( I recommend Kodak's #'s 8, 11 & 25A ), then try Ilford's

    Delta 100 & Delta 400 ISO films.

    Rate all the B&W films 1 stop over. This will align the Zone V exposure value of the scene,

    with the exposure latitude of the film. Then if you don't have a built-in meter, compensate

    using the filter exposure values, ( 1 stop, 1.5 stops & 3 stops, respectably ).

  2. #22
    Lloydy's Avatar
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    In my Zorki 4K I use Ilford XP2 from 7dayshop, get it processed at Tescos for 99 pence, then scan it. It's cheap photography and I get good results.




    This is from scanned XP2, it's not from the Zorki, but the film and processing can give you good results.

  3. #23
    lensworker's Avatar
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    Kodak Tri-X 400 developed in a 1:1 dilution of D-76 is my go to combo for B&W. It is hard to beat IMO.

    If you need more speed, I have found that Tri-X can be pushed to ISO 1600 with not much downside. You do lose a little contrast but not much. This can be corrected in the darkroom (or in Photoshop, if you print digitally).
    "My idea of a good life is that I wake up in the morning, go out and look around and make four rolls of film a day." - Josef Koudelka

    "There is only you and your camera. The limitations in your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are." - Ernst Haas

    "Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times…I just shoot at what interests me at that moment." – Elliott Erwitt

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanishing Point Ent. View Post

    Rate all the B&W films 1 stop over. This will align the Zone V exposure value of the scene,

    with the exposure latitude of the film. Then if you don't have a built-in meter, compensate

    using the filter exposure values, ( 1 stop, 1.5 stops & 3 stops, respectably ).
    More excellent responses, thank you.

    Vanishing Point - are you saying this is only applicable if shooting with a filter?

  5. #25

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    HP5+ is my daily film; Portra 400 for the (truly) rare bit of colour.

  6. #26
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    I've had good results with Ilford and with Kentmere, which is pretty inexpensive. Here in the US Freestyle is a really good source for BW film in many formats. I'd suggest using one film for a while, to get used to it.

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