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  1. #21

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    Kodak made or imported some really nice cameras. Interesting unorthodox designs seemed to be there thing. 1 of the nicer cameras I had early on was the Pony 135. Simple, very basic engineering with a very decent lens for its time. By today's standards a bit soft and not as contrasty as newer but, really yielded nice results. The lens retracted so it would fit in a pocket. In my home town the news photgraphers turned in their Speed Graphics and were using them.

  2. #22
    rjbuzzclick's Avatar
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    Ah, one of the good old battles for the American dollar!

    Reid

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjbuzzclick/

    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  3. #23

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    Back from the dead!!!! Test roll came back, ALL cloudy. It's like someone was hotboxing inside my camera and I've got it narrowed down to the front lens element. Doing a lens CLA on it as we speak.
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B&L 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
    4x5 Graphic View, made in USA! New project
    RB67 Pro S /50 4.5 / 90 3.8 / 180 4.5 / WLF / prism finder / polaback
    Random 35mm stuff

  4. #24
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    1945 Kodak 35RF!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianL View Post
    Kodak made or imported some really nice cameras. Interesting unorthodox designs seemed to be there thing. 1 of the nicer cameras I had early on was the Pony 135. Simple, very basic engineering with a very decent lens for its time. By today's standards a bit soft and not as contrasty as newer but, really yielded nice results. The lens retracted so it would fit in a pocket. In my home town the news photgraphers turned in their Speed Graphics and were using them.
    Wait they went from 4x5's to 35mm's? That's quite a shift... Was this common?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #25
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    The Kodak 35 RF is a neat little camera, but why did the Americans and the Soviets make such ugly looking cameras at that time?

  6. #26

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    A lot of cameras were ugly back then. Dig around a bit and you'll see the Germans and Japanese made some abominations too. I think Kodak made the RF35 ugly on purpose because they learned that customers liked the "scientific" look of the Argus C3.

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Goutiere View Post
    The Kodak 35 RF is a neat little camera, but why did the Americans and the Soviets make such ugly looking cameras at that time?
    Ever see an automobile from back then???

    PE

  8. #28
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Wait they went from 4x5's to 35mm's? That's quite a shift... Was this common?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    Some went first to medium format TLRs, but most jumped at the chance to use something that was a lot more portable.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #29
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    1945 Kodak 35RF!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Some went first to medium format TLRs, but most jumped at the chance to use something that was a lot more portable.
    But was this that enlarging technology got advanced and the 4x5 detail was no longer needed?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  10. #30
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    But was this that enlarging technology got advanced and the 4x5 detail was no longer needed?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    4 x 5 detail was essentially wasted in the process used to put the photographs on to newsprint - have you ever looked closely at the half-tones used in old newsprint photos .

    As 35mm cameras and lenses and systems became common, and 35mm film was improved, the smaller format was quickly recognized as being much more appropriate for deadline sensitive work.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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