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  1. #21
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    Quick off-topic question - why would you prefer the Mamiya with the scene-avg meter rather than the spot-meter?
    The M7II meter is very good for general (quick) color metering. Also, when the 43mm is on board, the meter may be used as a wide angle spot in evaluating a scene for exposure. That said, I almost always meter with my 1 degree Pentax spot for monochrome. If you pay attention to the camera's metering when using a spot, you may soon develop a fairly reliable feel for the exposure adjustments needed to shoot with the camera alone when either desired or necessary, depending on lighting and scene (e.g., open up 2 stops for proper shadow exposure, etc.).
    Last edited by ROL; 11-28-2012 at 12:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Considering you mentioned travel and going alone, you may want to reconsider the Fuji folder, if you are working with normal/wide focal lengths. The mamiya 7 is the size of a larger dslr, and the lenses aren't small either. Still a better choice than the rz.
    What focal lengths are you using on your non-film bodies? Why must it be a rangefinder?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Now if I could only find a cheap viewfinder for my 43mm...
    The cheapest solution is none at all. The 43mm view in the M7II's viewfinder is about the existing perimeter indicators plus their line width, give or take, at infinity. Neither precise nor elegant, but useful all the same, particularly if you don't mind slight crops when printing.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by arpinum View Post
    Considering you mentioned travel and going alone, you may want to reconsider the Fuji folder, if you are working with normal/wide focal lengths. The mamiya 7 is the size of a larger dslr, and the lenses aren't small either. Still a better choice than the rz.
    What focal lengths are you using on your non-film bodies? Why must it be a rangefinder?
    I looked at Fuji folder, very nice piece of kit that, but the lack of an interchangeable lens kills it for me.

    I'm thinking of using the film camera alongside the H3DII back. I'm still considering the Mamiya 7ii but looking at the prices on ebay it seems a lot with the only visible draw being the larger neg and resolution. (As mentioned earlier I can easily go 645 with a H1/H2 body).

    Something else kills the Fuji too, I never use 35mm, if I go wide it's 24mm for landscapes and such, 50mm occasionally with my most common being the 70-120 range (35mm equiv).

  5. #25
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    I'm looking for a 6x7 rangefinder, need help choosing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Giles View Post
    I looked at Fuji folder, very nice piece of kit that, but the lack of an interchangeable lens kills it for me.

    I'm thinking of using the film camera alongside the H3DII back. I'm still considering the Mamiya 7ii but looking at the prices on ebay it seems a lot with the only visible draw being the larger neg and resolution. (As mentioned earlier I can easily go 645 with a H1/H2 body).

    Something else kills the Fuji too, I never use 35mm, if I go wide it's 24mm for landscapes and such, 50mm occasionally with my most common being the 70-120 range (35mm equiv).
    FYI the M7 II is just a bit thinner than the canon 5D and the lenses a but longer than a 5D's equivalent so basically its like carting a 5D to give you some idea of size.

    Best of luck!


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #26

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    The Mamiya lenses are narrower diameter than most all the canon EOS lenses, and lighter too I think, so on balance, a smaller package than a 5D and lenses.

    The meter is the same between the 7 and 7II. The only differences are the 7II offers is a polarization layer on the rangefinder window (debatable value - really not noticable unless shooting into the sun), and it has a multi-exposure capability. The negatives are the 7II's darkslide wind lever is seriously flawed and far inferior to the one on the regular 7. I've had both bodies at the same time, and later sold the 7II as it didn't really offer anything over the 7.

    All the lenses are great. The close-up adapter is a bit kludgy but optically excellent. The polaroid back is best if dedicated to a 2nd body. It's not really feasible to switch it on and off a single body to interchange with normal film use.

    Bottom line: the Mamiya 7 is easily the best 6x7 rangefinder available, and I think in many ways the best medium format system available. (I have an RZ system as well, and that is better for the few things the Mamiya 7 is not great at: long lenses, close-ups, portraits, fast lenses).

    -Ed

  7. #27

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    I have the New Mamiya 6 and the Fuji GF670. I would strongly recommend either but realize that the 6 won't fit your needs since it shoots 6x6. But it is such a sweet camera! And much more portable than the 7 or 7ii because of the collapsing lens mount. Also no need for external VF. The lenses are excellent as well. And of course the GF670 is limited to one lens, but it is still a fabulous camera to work with. I also have the very old Mamiya Press Super 23, and it is really fun to shoot. But admittedly it is very big and bulky for a rangefinder. But it does have exchangeable lenses and exchangeable backs for a variety of frame sizes. You mentioned older Fuji rangefinders with exchangeable lenses. Fuji has been making top notch medium format rangefinders for a long time but the only 6x7 one that has exchangeable lenses is the very early GM670 along with the G690 and GL690. These all date back to the late 60's and early 70's. Everything after that had fixed lenses.

    You asked about 645. If you do choose that route there are more options but first you have to decide if you are ok with the smaller frame.
    Pentax 67ii, Fuji GF670, Mamiya 6, Pentax 645N
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  8. #28
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    I'm looking for a 6x7 rangefinder, need help choosing.

    Quote Originally Posted by EdSawyer View Post
    The Mamiya lenses are narrower diameter than most all the canon EOS lenses, and lighter too I think, so on balance, a smaller package than a 5D and lenses.

    The meter is the same between the 7 and 7II. The only differences are the 7II offers is a polarization layer on the rangefinder window (debatable value - really not noticable unless shooting into the sun), and it has a multi-exposure capability. The negatives are the 7II's darkslide wind lever is seriously flawed and far inferior to the one on the regular 7. I've had both bodies at the same time, and later sold the 7II as it didn't really offer anything over the 7.

    All the lenses are great. The close-up adapter is a bit kludgy but optically excellent. The polaroid back is best if dedicated to a 2nd body. It's not really feasible to switch it on and off a single body to interchange with normal film use.

    Bottom line: the Mamiya 7 is easily the best 6x7 rangefinder available, and I think in many ways the best medium format system available. (I have an RZ system as well, and that is better for the few things the Mamiya 7 is not great at: long lenses, close-ups, portraits, fast lenses).

    -Ed
    Ed, the 7's meter is a spot meter, the 7 II's is a weighted average meter, VERY different.

    I worry about the dark slide tab as it does seem breakable, BUT I found the 7's to be hard to turn which I'm sure is why they made the 7 II's with a flip out.

    I agree the Polaroid back isn't really that useful. It's great for checking focus as it has a sort of ground glass, but they could have found a way to add some kind of dark slide so you don't expose it when you take it off.

    I like the multi exposure button, I've used it.

    More than anything I like the panoramic adapter that lets you use 35mm film in the body, have some REALY nice pano's from mine.


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #29

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    The most difficult love affair.

    Greetings all! I very much enjoy the the forum. Hats off to all who contribute so much great content. 5 years ago I bought
    a Linhof Technika 70 outfit for $1490.00. It had the three original lenses, (53mm, 100mm & 150mm), with cam, roll film back,
    ground glass, metal case, filters and shade. It became the greatest love affair/mental and physical wrestling match of my photo
    existance!! I mean, Demands! Demands! Demands! What kind of demands? Demands for excellence from me!
    I mean, I had to step up! I would come home, after a shoot, with my rags, (called exposures), and the T-70 would just
    look at me. But, by golly, bye and bye, I got better!! It was like Fred Astair said about dancing. Hard work, but loving every minute.
    Of course, the person is the photographer, not the camera. But the right match can drive you like a "strad". The camera is easy to use. But it is so versitile, that you are drawn into "THE WORKOUT!" Your brain is squeeezzzed to step up! And when your done, in an heap of sweat, you are sooo thankful, as you reflect upon the day that has passed. All the best!

  10. #30
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    I fully endorse the Mamiya 7II, having used one for 8 years. The 65mm lens has become my default lens, as its a wide angle without the need for a viewfinder, but for landscapes I use the 43mm with finder, which gives you dramatic shots with plenty of foreground, or sky.Print quality with all lenses is amazing, and I print up to 16x12

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