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  1. #51
    lxdude's Avatar
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    The only way to see your Leica as investment is if you buy a vestment with a pocket big enough to hold it.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #52
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    I would only hope that those who keep saving their money and never spending it on anything for fun would realize that they can't take it with them. I once heard a pastor say that in the many hundreds of funerals he had attended he never once saw an armored car following the hearse!
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    A cameras value is only in the pictures it creates.
    I agree on the basis that productivity is the prime reason to buy a camera.

    To the OP, a camera that makes the pictures is worth more than one sat in a drawer, whatever the purchase price of each. Except every Leica body or lens I have ever bought (excluding a relatively recent full frame body that cannot be mentioned on APUG for reasons that go against the 'prime directive'), is now worth considerably more than I bought it for (ten lenses, currently three film bodies). Yet they are not investments, they are to use, and so have to take the potential abuse. So an 'investment' would be something to put out of the way of risk as much as possible, otherwise trying to use it is likely compromise the pictures made by being too careful.

    Steve

  4. #54

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    I shoot Leica and have bought and sold a few lenses. I have always profited, even if I paid "normal" used price when buying. I know at least one lens I owned that was worth $1100 in 2006 is now going for well over $2000. So yeah, if you choose lenses carefully, they will generally all appreciate. Bodies, not so much.

    And I can't think of a time when Leica lens values went down rather than up.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    Income isn't what makes people wealthy as much as outgo keeps them from saving money. We tend to keep up with the Jonses. As an ancient Jones, I try to make that easy, but people persist in wasting money on large screen TVs, cell phones with cameras and GPS, video games, dinners out, and other money sponges. Most of these don't enhance the quality of life, but they do keep us from really living. Henry Thoreau may have overdone the basic lifestyle at Walden Pond, but it certainly beat going into debt for unnecessary baggage. Many Americans learned how to make do with nearly nothing in the 1930s. It was a tough time, but it made tough people who could teach their descendants much.
    I have zero debt. Friends and acquaintances are very confused about how I manage to be semi-retired at 46 with a thirty foot boat. Some of it was just plain good luck, but it was important that I was in a mental and financial position to allow that luck to happen, and then be able to take advantage of it. Everything you have that you don't own, owns you. I learned that some time ago.

    All my camera gear has been an investment, but the investment is realized by the cash flow created by my use of the camera. There are about a zillion better investments than capitol appreciation on a camera. Burying money in a hole is among them.
    That's just, like, my opinion, man...

  6. #56
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Everything you have that you don't own, owns you.
    A very wise and true statement.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #57

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    Is the Leica an "Investment?"

    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    I have zero debt. Friends and acquaintances are very confused about how I manage to be semi-retired at 46 with a thirty foot boat. Some of it was just plain good luck, but it was important that I was in a mental and financial position to allow that luck to happen, and then be able to take advantage of it. Everything you have that you don't own, owns you. I learned that some time ago.

    All my camera gear has been an investment, but the investment is realized by the cash flow created by my use of the camera. There are about a zillion better investments than capitol appreciation on a camera. Burying money in a hole is among them.
    +1 heck +10

    Want to pass along some of that luck? I'm ready to receive it, I really am, tell me where to go and what to do and I'll do it

    Also, a Leica is just like a leaky boat, too expensive and not worth the effort in labor... Hehe


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #58
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    Yes, let's take a look around. Who would want to bring children into the world as it is? After all, the U.N. 1990 poverty goal for 2015 was met in 2008. The world economy grew 6% in the last 7 years, but fossil fuel consumption went down by 4%. Life expectancy in Africa is 5 years longer than it was 10 years ago. The last decade had fewer war deaths than any decade in the 20th century.

    Who would ever want to bring children into the world as it was in 1945? Oh, right. My sister was born in 1946.

    Who would ever want to bring children into the world as it was in 1916?. Oh, right. My parents were both born in 1917.
    My mother was born in 1938, my aunt in 1940 and my other aunt in 1942. After which, my grand-father went volunteer in WWII in 1943 (he was 32 and with three children, never to be called) to defend the fatherland from the incoming invasion by the bloody foreigner. Apparently somebody with a lot of belly and not many hair told him we would have repelled the invader on the shores of Sicily*.

    The lesson I can derive from this is that if only rational people made children, the world would be inhabited by now

    * He told me later that on southern Sicily where he was sent the defence was constituted by an average machine-gun every 11 km of coast. Not joking.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #59

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    My outlook on investing, and business in general, is always to do a little better tomorrow than I did today. In business, I try to increase my inventory and sales by 5% a month. It's not at all easy, I don't have a lot of experience being in business for myself, but after three years of steadily increasing sales, I have learned a lot. Last year I passed the point where my business income passed what I get from my regular job. I find that now I have money, but I rarely have any free time or a day off.

    In the next year I will incorporate, and if sales improve as much as they hope, I will quit my job, and work for myself. I recently branched out into a new field of goods, and the results were better than expected. Unfortunately, I don't have enough time to pursue the new goods until I hire a helper to do some of my current work.

    When I was young, I didn't have a good idea about how investments worked. It seemed like black magic to me. I discovered that investing was simply buying low and selling high. I eventually found a niche in which I could invest in something I understood and enjoyed. I was surprised that I could make money at it.

    It is nice to see business and investments grow. It is like building a house, or creating a painting. It is fun to try other ideas and see the results, and even more fun when the ideas are successful. I now have to become a better time manager.

  10. #60
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    I'm sure many will disagree, but in the 30's and 40's, if you were insistent on shooting the 35mm films of the day, a Leica would be the only way to go.. However, nowadays, a Leica is more jewelry than actual tool. Just my opinion.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome



 

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