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Thread: Old Leica Kit

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    If the 85mm says Leitz on it then it should be a Summarex, but they were f/1.5, not f/4, so something is amiss.

    Steve
    Steve, it was definitely a Leitz 85mm - but I didn't take the cap off the front to look for closer inspection. I may have confused the distance markings for the maximum aperture, but I am sure that it was the real deal. Haha, as always, the problem was me, not the lens;-)

  2. #22

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    Take some pictures of the kit and post them here....

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Christian View Post
    As for your second question, you can tell a real rangefinder (as opposed to viewfinder cameras) from the patch in the middle of the viewfinder image. Aligning this patch with the rest of your view focuses the image. Simple viewfinder cameras will have framelines to help you compose, and they may even adjust for parallax, but no patch.
    This is correct, with one caveat.

    There are range-finder cameras that present you with two windows to look through.

    The larger, brighter one you use for framing your subject.

    The smaller, "squintier" one is used just for focussing - it has a coupled range-finder patch that you align for focussing. The view through that window may only be part of the scene.

    I don't know if there are Leica versions of this approach, but there certainly are others. The rangefinder versions of the Kodak 35 are an example.
    Matt

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  4. #24
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    The 111A was very common, so prices reflect this. The 111F and 111G were less so and a bit easier to use with the rangefinder and viewfinder windows much closer together. The 111G is the most collectable because it has the frames for 90mm plus is the last of the Barnack (screw) Leicas.
    Should be a perfectly useable kit, even given it's age, though a 111G kit like that would be worth far more to a collector especially if you have a 28mm Summaron and the 85mm Summarex.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Thanks for the Leica info.

    As far as the RF bit, I know how to tell a viewfinder from a RF I meant how is it differentiated in writing ... Like is it called a "Parallax RF" or a "coupled RF" or what? thanks.
    a coupled rangefinder means the rangefinder -- the optics that measure the distance -- are built into the camera and linked to the lens, so as you focus the lens you match the patches in the rangefinder. The rangefinder window on screw mount leicas is separate from the viewing window. On M-series leicas it is built into the viewing window.

    an UNcoupled rangefinder is a rangefinder that is separate from the camera. You us it to find the distance, set that distance on the lens and take the picture.

    A parallax corrected viewfinder is one in which the frame lines in the viewfinder adjust for whether the object being shot is closer or farther away. Generally, higher quality rangefinder cameras with coupled rangefinders that are build into the viewing window, such as M- leicas, have these. I think the IIIg does too, but don't quote me.

  6. #26
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    Old Leica Kit

    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    a coupled rangefinder means the rangefinder -- the optics that measure the distance -- are built into the camera and linked to the lens, so as you focus the lens you match the patches in the rangefinder. The rangefinder window on screw mount leicas is separate from the viewing window. On M-series leicas it is built into the viewing window.

    an UNcoupled rangefinder is a rangefinder that is separate from the camera. You us it to find the distance, set that distance on the lens and take the picture.

    A parallax corrected viewfinder is one in which the frame lines in the viewfinder adjust for whether the object being shot is closer or farther away. Generally, higher quality rangefinder cameras with coupled rangefinders that are build into the viewing window, such as M- leicas, have these. I think the IIIg does too, but don't quote me.
    Gotcha, so then ... For example my Zeiss Ikon Contina Matic II has a viewing window, but no measurement ability for focussing you simply are able to turn the front lens element to the correct distance only by measuring with a ruler or guessing distance. So is this not really a rangefinder? What is this called since it has no range-finding ability. Is it just a viewing window camera?


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  7. #27

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    I will try to take some pictures next time I go over there. I've been working on an email in which I try recap some of what I've learned here.

    On this model, the viewing window with the framelines is separate from the rangefinder focusing window, though they are next to each other and not too inconvenient.

  8. #28
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwreich View Post
    On this model, the viewing window with the framelines is separate from the rangefinder focusing window, though they are next to each other and not too inconvenient.
    Yes, that was a good idea they did that, as opposed to not next to each other. ;-)
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  9. #29

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    Cheeky, Rich;-)

  10. #30

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    As far as I know, there is no Leica III with projected framelines that has non-unified windows. If you have two windows (separate RF and VF windows), it does not have projected framelines.

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