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  1. #21
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    It wasn't Edward Weston who made the meter, just a coincidental manufacturer's name. Mine in the picture is a "Weston Master II Universal - Model 735" and I am surprised how accurate it is, considering I have had a few Weston meters which weren't this accurate.

    I like the direct relationship between meter reading and print, because the chips of tone came from one of my prints of a step wedge. I can trust that for a "Normal" scene, as I approach different objects with the meter and check the reading against the "sample patch"... All I have to do is ask myself if I would be happy with that part of the picture matching that chip on the meter. If so... then the meter reading is correct for the shot. Very often I will hold my hand up and "place" that reading on Zone VI.

    If you get an old Weston Master, set the Emulsion Speed by pointing the arrow at one-third stop beneath Light "400" and check the "Sunny 16" correlation of shutter speed at f/16. I use Emulsion Speed 160 = EI 250, but have heard different variations of the dial scales exist so you may need a different corresponding Emulsion Speed... The Sunny-16 rule should always work (one-third stop below 400).
    Last edited by Bill Burk; 07-31-2013 at 01:09 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    It wasn't Edward Weston who made the meter, just a coincidental manufacturer's name.
    Woops you are correct, Ive been spreading web gossip...
    more complete brief here
    http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meter...n-article.html
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    If you get an old Weston Master, set the Emulsion Speed by pointing the arrow at one-third stop beneath Light "400" and check the "Sunny 16" correlation of shutter speed at f/16. I use Emulsion Speed 160 = EI 250, but have heard different variations of the dial scales exist so you may need a different corresponding Emulsion Speed... The Sunny-16 rule should always work (one-third stop below 400).
    Supposedly the speed dial changed some where between model II and III, or part way through the III production run. The top dials are the 'same' but the newer ISO (then ASA) speeds were adapted which were 1/3 of stop different from the 'Weston speed' standard used on all II and earlier models. You seem to be using 2/3 of a stop and I don't really bother and I just use ISO. When I shot Kodachrome II I used the 1/3 of a stop.

    Id not change as meters can easily be out 1/3 of a stop.

    I just use 'U' as zone 1, and count from there...
    Last edited by Xmas; 07-31-2013 at 05:46 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added weston speed comments

  3. #23
    David Allen's Avatar
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    Weston Masters are indeed fine and very useful tools. I personally don't need to stick on a Zone step wedge but have found that to be very helpful for students. For my personal photography (originally large-format landscapes, then Leica street photography, then 6 x 9 rangefinder 'orchestrated' people in the city shots and now, for many many years, 6 x 7 urban landscapes plus many years of commercial photography) I have never found the need for a spot meter.

    What I have found when running workshops where students brought along spot meters are the following:

    You need to know what kind of cell the spot meter employs as many earlier spot meters employed a cell that does not 'see' colours the same as film.

    A spot meter needs to be calibrated carefully to your working methods and equipment using practical 'real world' tests. This is because the meters themselves suffer from optical flare due to the use of a lens to create the spot meter and this can be at large variance from the internal flare of your equipment. Also, people tend to use the meters at a distance from the subject and the meter's reaction to atmospheric effects can be quite different from your equipment/film combination.

    Many spot meters do not have a lens hood or other light shielding attachment and this can also introduce a variance to the reading. The simplest solution to this that I have found (that works incredibly well I might add) was attaching the inner core of a toilet roll to the meter's lens.

    Finally, if people move in close to measure, lets say a Zone III shadow area, with a spot meter it is all too easy to meter an especially dark or light area of said shadow.

    For all of these (for me at least) negatives I have found the Westons to be a better tool. Generally I go close to a shadow area that I want to render as Zone III and meter that. The averaging nature of the Weston will then indicate an exposure that produces an averaged Zone III with some areas darker and lighter. This then gives, in the final print, an area that is rendered as Zone III with a variation of tones that give the shadow area a spectrum of greys that makes this particular shadow area full of 'life'.

    Bests,

    David
    www.dsallen.de

  4. #24
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Supposedly the speed dial changed some where between model II and III, or part way through the III production run.
    My finding was based on comments from European owners who set the arrow, shutter speed and f/16 same as I do and say they see a different Emulsion Speed in the window. So I believe even within Master II there are variations of the scale.
    Last edited by Bill Burk; 07-31-2013 at 11:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    My finding was based on comments from European owners who set the arrow, shutter speed and f/16 same as I do and say they see a different Emulsion Speed in the window. So I believe even within Master II there are variations of the scale.
    Well given you are only 1/3 of a stop away from what I would use with slide film Id not worry. Monochrome is easier.

    But I've now looked at my service II and III and they say

    II - Weston speed
    III - Weston rating

    That was 1/3 off ASA when there were tables for the correspondence of DIN, BS, Sch, ASA & Weston. But I also do a calibration but it is not within 1/3 of a stop, my meters needles are the same within 1/3, something different.

    As you suggest the scales are indeed different the III is actually ISO not Weston! So the change over from one standard to other was stealthy... it is 'easy' to detect when it occured cause the galvo is calibrated in absolute units.

    Think my II is early the III late in their respective production runs, so they could have changed any time in the II and III production.

    Thank you for telling me about your group calibration results.

  6. #26

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    Thanks to all

    I managed to score a Weston 515 for $5 including shipping. Also got a Pentax Spotmeter V for $75 including shipping. So, I've got all the bases covered. Both meters seem to be right on and cosmetically in pristine condition. Got lucky with e-bay this time.

    Jim

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