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  1. #11
    clayne's Avatar
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    Yep use a throwaway roll to verify the camera's film transport works. I've seen advances where the first frame or so works but then slipping or ratchet failing starts happening as the slack is taken out of the roll. This is with cameras that have a clutch like (maybe not literally, but *like*) advance spindle for when it needs to be rewound.

    If its a camera issue I bet it coincides with when the roll has the slack taken out and the advance has to do real work.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #12

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    It does look like the film slipped off the take up spool.
    Someone else mentioned we've all done it. I know I have. Those, by the way were the best ones I had ever taken.(HA!)

    With a camera like this, I make sure the film is secure on the take up by advancing an extra frame, closing the back and putting tension on the film by turning the rewind knob in the direction of the arrow WITHOUT pushing the button on the bottom of the camera. Then, when you advance the camera, you should see the RW knob rotate.

    You say these were the last two frames you took. Were you watching the counter or did the camera stop advancing? If it stopped advancing, it get to the end of the roll. If you were watching the counter, it works even if the film isn't connected or even if the camera is empty.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #13
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    [ ... ']

    You say these were the last two frames you took. Were you watching the counter or did the camera stop advancing? If it stopped advancing, it get to the end of the roll. If you were watching the counter, it works even if the film isn't connected or even if the camera is empty.
    This is where I'm a bit confused by the OP. If the frame "0" is taken from the frame number on the film, it's at the leader end ("Beginning") which would fit with the film not fed. Now I believe there were some cameras, likely of the motor wound variety that when loaded would wind the film all the way to the end, then work backwards down to the leader. My last Konica was an FP SLR circa 1963, so I am not a fount of knowledge on the later flavors of the brand.

  4. #14
    chuck94022's Avatar
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    Ok, some interesting puzzles and clues here.

    Clues:
    1) The two frames properly exposed were the last two he said he shot. (Not the first two)
    2) The remaining frames are clear, not dark.
    3) There are no completely dark frames other than the remains of the roll after the last good frame, under the id tape.
    4) He was able to continue to wind past frame 24.

    The Konica C35 automatic is both sophisticated and not. From what I can tell on the web, not having owned one, it is an inexpensively built (cost reduced most likely) camera from Konica, possibly outsourced to Cosina or other manufacturer. It has a manual film advance, and does have a rewind crank that can be observed.

    I will take clue 1 at face value. Thus we assume he was able to advance the film.

    Clue 2 indicates that while the film advanced, the shutter did not open. I trust he removed the lens cap and didn't take the first shots in his darkroom with the lights out.

    Clue 3 indicates that the film did not stick on a frame and do 22 or more multiple exposures. There are no dark frames preceding the two good frames.

    Clue 4 is a puzzle, but not one that should stop us in our tracks.

    So, I mentioned the Konica is sophisticated. It appears to be a fully automatic camera. You don't get to control the exposure to any significant degree, other than setting the ISO. You don't get aperture priority, for example. If you can set the shutter speed at all, your choices are extremely limited (I'm unclear on exact shutter settings).

    My diagnosis, based on being blindfolded and only touching part of the elephant, is this: The shutter is gummed up. After about 22 shots, it finally freed up enough to respond to the shutter button. He got two exposures, but whether they were proper or not is not clear, since he was shooting C-41 color with it's extreme tolerance for exposure error. Looking at the film he provided they look quite dark, telling me the shutter was moving slow.

    I would say the camera is in need of a CLA. Why would it continue to wind and shoot after the last frame? I have no idea. It is designed as a point and shoot for unsophisticated photographers - maybe the winder allows this so that a naive consumer won't break the roll trying to force it to advance.

    Here's another puzzle: He said it was a roll of 24 frames. This is confusing to me, I don't know of any readily available 24 frame C-41 film. But I could be wrong, maybe the Lomo folks offer that.

    If this was in fact a roll of 36 frames, perhaps these shots were from the middle of the roll, the previous shots were severely over exposed (the clipped off black "leader"), and the blank frames are the frames he didn't shoot, thinking he was past the end of his 24 frame roll.

    But why the frames are marked 0 and X reduce the odds of the above being the case.

    In any case, if it is worth it, I would get a CLA done on the camera. But given that it is such a cheap little camera, it might not be worth it. Also, given that camera's limited functionality, I'd be going for something else anyway, like an Oly 35RD or equivalent, to allow for a little more control, with a faster lens.

  5. #15
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Agfa Vista + film comes in 24 exposure cassettes. It is sold in Poundland in Britain (for £1.00!).

  6. #16

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    Not always in 24s, often in 36s (I have both at the moment)

  7. #17
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022 View Post
    Clues:
    1) The two frames properly exposed were the last two he said he shot. (Not the first two)
    4) He was able to continue to wind past frame 24.
    .
    I have a theory that fits this.

    The film didn't catch the takeup spool when first loaded... but after some 20-or-so shots, it FINALLY caught and started winding...

    So it might have been good to go, but OP rewound and sent the film in for processing.

    ---
    All good advice to check the wind knob is turning as the shooting progresses. Good to check that the camera can make it through a roll of scrap film when properly loaded... But chances are... Next time you shoot... You'll get a good roll of film.

  8. #18

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    Wow, thanks for all the good replies. I spent last night experimenting with loading of the film, and I think you're right that that has been the problem. I wasn't aware of the trick of looking at the rewind button (but I am now, so thank you ;-)). I tried loading another film and saw that the rewind button wasn't turning when I took pictures, so I tried again loading the film, and this time it did turn!

    Thanks again for all the replies, it has helped A LOT.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagree View Post
    Wow, thanks for all the good replies. I spent last night experimenting with loading of the film, and I think you're right that that has been the problem. I wasn't aware of the trick of looking at the rewind button (but I am now, so thank you ;-)). I tried loading another film and saw that the rewind button wasn't turning when I took pictures, so I tried again loading the film, and this time it did turn!

    Thanks again for all the replies, it has helped A LOT.
    It looks like you have figured things out, but for clarity:

    There is both a film rewind button (on the bottom of the camera) and a film rewind crank (on the top of the camera).

    When you are at the end of the film, you push the button, and then rewind with the crank.

    As mentioned, to confirm that the film is winding properly, take up slack with the rewind crank and watch to make sure that the crank turns when you wind the film.

    I used to sell the C35 - in 1980 or so.

    Have fun!

    By the way, 24 exposure rolls are still around, although I'm not sure how widely available they are.

    And the C35 manual only refers to 20 and 36 exposure rolls!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Did the rewind crank turn when you advanced the film? The film may have slipped off the spool.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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