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  1. #11
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    So if the lens-flange face wears down over time, then eventually the elements will come microscopically closer to the film flange. But that is offset by the fact that the rangefinder flange also comes closer to the film at the same rate, so it all evens out in the end. Except that at 'infinity' on the lens may be past infinity, but other things being equal the rangefinder will still be accurate.

    I'd be more concerned about the rangefinder cam and/or the flange on the lens getting worn out. Mount and unmount all you want, just don't change focus too often!
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    So if the lens-flange face wears down over time, then eventually the elements will come microscopically closer to the film flange. But that is offset by the fact that the rangefinder flange also comes closer to the film at the same rate, so it all evens out in the end. Except that at 'infinity' on the lens may be past infinity, but other things being equal the rangefinder will still be accurate.

    I'd be more concerned about the rangefinder cam and/or the flange on the lens getting worn out. Mount and unmount all you want, just don't change focus too often!
    ??? Your post makes little sense to me. For example, what do you me by the "rangefinder flange" There is a flange on the camera body onto which the lens sits.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Nope, these lenses are threads are pretty hefty, as long as you never force a lens on, or try to force on a lens with damaged threads you should be fine. Also to reduce stress on the rangefinder cam, I always thread my lenses on with them set to the closest focusing distance. Its a good habit to pick up. I also store my lenses like that as well, with plastic rear caps screwed on and focus to closest.

  4. #14
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    ??? Your post makes little sense to me. For example, what do you me by the "rangefinder flange" There is a flange on the camera body onto which the lens sits.
    What I meant was the bit on the lens that contacts the rangefinder cam in the body. On some of my lenses it's an entire ring around the inside of the lens that rotates when it moves closer to/from the film, on others it's a ~1cm-wide bit of metal that just moves in and out to move the rangefinder cam.
    My reasoning is that if the mounting flanges on the lens and/or camera wear down, then the lens screws on a bit farther each time, the elements are closer to the film so go 'past' infinity, but the rangefinder cam is also pushed the same distance, so it all evens out.

    (but yes, my post wasn't meant to make sense. Translated, it means you can either not use your lenses, miss shots because you've got the 'wrong' lens on, and keep them in useless pristine condition, or you can use them as intended and not worry about some minor wear and tear that may result from taking great shots...)
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  5. #15

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    Much clearer now. There is usually an internal adjustment within the lens that can be used to correct for any wear.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16

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    The lens cam follower in the camera in the Leica and clones is a little wheel that rotates when you focus a lens so the wear over decades of hard pro use is imperceptible unless the wheel jams.

    Only the Russians did not copy the rolling wheel.

    The chrome plating on the cameras registration datum only sees a few degrees of contact as you tighten the lens. On a strip the technican needs to shim the datum to the registration distance as he rebuilds.

    The long base rfdr are good for f/0.95 lenses the short base Canon VI ok for /1.2...

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Think about a piston in the cylinder. I'll bet it moves more times than you will ever change lenses.
    Or the watch in my pocket, which was made the year the Titanic had that mishap. Five ticks per second, and lets say it's only run half of those 101 years...

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