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  1. #1

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    First rangefinder.

    I picked up my first rangefinder last week, a Canon QL17 GIII. It's quite the change from an SLR! Focusing is a challenge with that miniature yellow square in the middle of frame!! Geez.

    I was giving it a try today and discovered a few interesting things. 1) If the meter needle is not within the red exposures limits, you cannot press down the shutter. I couldn't figure out where the meter needle was, and kept trying to fire off shots, but the shutter wouldn't press down. It was sunny here in Chicago today and with the lens stopped down to f16 and using the fastest shutter speed of 1/500 - I actually couldn't take a picture using 400 speed film. Even cutting my exposure in half by using 800 speed film may not have done the trick - i'm not sure. (I've been using an FE2, so the 1/500 is quite slow. (neutral density filter will likely help here??)

    Then I was inside later in the evening, after dark, and actually was having a similar problem on the other end. I was having trouble, with 400 speed film, to get within the exposure range.

    The shutter is extremely quiet and the camera just has that wonderful sexy 70's look. Even if I take horrendous photos, I look really cool carrying this thing around.

    Mark

  2. #2
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    If you take the setting off 'A' (automatic) and just use it with manual settings, the battery isn't required and there is no interlock. And the truth is, if you don't have a 1.35-volt PX-625 mercury cell or equivalent in the battery compartment, your exposures are going to be off anyway, unless the meter has been readjusted for a different cell voltage.

    You're right, though. It's a killer little rangefinder with a shutter that is quieter than a Leica. Or at least the Leicas I've heard. And because it's a leaf shutter, it flash-syncs at all speeds, making fill-in flash a comparative breeze to do on the fly.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  3. #3

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    The little Canon is a very well made camera. Probably among the best of the bunch among the smaller rangefinders from the 1970s.

  4. #4
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Ken Nadvornick and elekm have it right.

    Used manually, that camera will do what you want. (Unlike other cameras that do what they want).

    The thing I remember most about my QL17GIII is the high yield.

    I got a greater percentage of good pictures per roll from that camera than almost any other. I know no higher praise to bestow upon a camera.

  5. #5

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    Even cutting my exposure in half by using 800 speed film may not have done the trick - i'm not sure.
    If it was too bright for 1/500 f16 @ ISO 400...800 would have only made it worse.

    Hope to see some shots soon!

    My Canonet is among my favorite cameras out of all that I own or have owned. I'm sure you'll have a great time with it.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold View Post
    If it was too bright for 1/500 f16 @ ISO 400...800 would have only made it worse.

    Hope to see some shots soon!

    My Canonet is among my favorite cameras out of all that I own or have owned. I'm sure you'll have a great time with it.
    Ahh yes, I meant 100 speed film. Anyways, you get the point even though it made no sense!

  7. #7
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Another thing to remember. If you are using this camera with the meter it's imperative that you also use it with a lens hood. This is because the meter cell is incorporated into the top front of the lens mount. Unshielded in this position it will pick up too large a portion of the open sky. Even on overcast days this will skew your readings. I know this from both personal experience as well as online reading.

    If you can find one, the hood to get is the threaded black metal Hoya 48mm. It's robust and shades the lens and light cell well, without intruding too much into your rangefinder window. It also works well with a filter behind it. I set up an email alert on the ugly auction site for mine. Took about nine months, but I got one in LN condition for a fair price.

    The next best option, and probably for less money, is a threaded black metal Kalt 49mm hood with a 49-48mm step ring. This combination give a very deep and dark recess for the lens. It does not vignette, although looking at it you won't believe that's possible. The only drawbacks are a bit more intrusion into the rangefinder window, and adding a filter behind it will just push it over the vignette limit. It's that close.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Another thing to remember. If you are using this camera with the meter it's imperative that you also use it with a lens hood. This is because the meter cell is incorporated into the top front of the lens mount. Unshielded in this position it will pick up too large a portion of the open sky. Even on overcast days this will skew your readings. I know this from both personal experience as well as online reading.

    If you can find one, the hood to get is the threaded black metal Hoya 48mm. It's robust and shades the lens and light cell well, without intruding too much into your rangefinder window. It also works well with a filter behind it. I set up an email alert on the ugly auction site for mine. Took about nine months, but I got one in LN condition for a fair price.

    The next best option, and probably for less money, is a threaded black metal Kalt 49mm hood with a 49-48mm step ring. This combination give a very deep and dark recess for the lens. It does not vignette, although looking at it you won't believe that's possible. The only drawbacks are a bit more intrusion into the rangefinder window, and adding a filter behind it will just push it over the vignette limit. It's that close.

    Ken
    Good to know. Thanks, Ken.



 

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