Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,491   Posts: 1,542,946   Online: 903
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    52

    Leica M2- Where to start film advance counter?

    My M2 kit is finally set up and ready for shooting, and while a film advance counter that doesn't automatically reset doesn't bother me too much, I'm not quite sure where to start it. Do folks set it to ~38 and start from 1 as normal?

    Also, I'm a bit confused about the DIN/ASA dial on the back- did Germans have their own set of film speed numbers at the time?

    Looking forward to getting good use out of it this weekend!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ogden, Utah USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,060
    load the film, crank off two blank frames while making sure the rewind knob is rotating backwards, THEN turn the film counter until it is pointing at one. TAke pictures, rewind film, lather, rinse, repeat.

    The din/asa dial is because the Germans, at one time, used the DIN scale instead of ASA which is now ISO. A DIN of 21 is the same as ASA 100, DIN of 27 is the same as 400, and so on (or, in German, 'usw' = 'und so weiter').

    Nobody uses DIN any more, but you still find some old meters marked in it.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,369
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    load the film, crank off two blank frames while making sure the rewind knob is rotating backwards, THEN turn the film counter until it is pointing at one. TAke pictures, rewind film, lather, rinse, repeat.

    The din/asa dial is because the Germans, at one time, used the DIN scale instead of ASA which is now ISO. A DIN of 21 is the same as ASA 100, DIN of 27 is the same as 400, and so on (or, in German, 'usw' = 'und so weiter').

    Nobody uses DIN any more, but you still find some old meters marked in it.
    Actually ...

    The DIN and ASA standards were combined into the modern ISO standard. It continues to be correct to specify film sensitivity as 100/21 where 100 is the arithmetic sensitivity (as ASA was) and 21 is the logarithmic sensitivity (as DIN was).

    We most commonly see just the arithmetic part.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    52
    Just what I needed to know, thanks!

  5. #5
    Trask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,079
    Images
    6
    And if we moved to binary code sensitivity, in our modern digital age, ISO 100 would be...1100100. Try fitting that on a meter dial!

    Now excuse me while I go push develop some Tri-X 110010000 to 11001000000!

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,426
    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    load the film, crank off two blank frames while making sure the rewind knob is rotating backwards, THEN turn the film counter until it is pointing at one. TAke pictures, rewind film, lather, rinse, repeat.

    The din/asa dial is because the Germans, at one time, used the DIN scale instead of ASA which is now ISO. A DIN of 21 is the same as ASA 100, DIN of 27 is the same as 400, and so on (or, in German, 'usw' = 'und so weiter').

    Nobody uses DIN any more, but you still find some old meters marked in it.
    DIN = Deutsche Industrie Norm.
    ASA = American Standards Association.
    ISO = International Organisation for Standardisation.
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 10-25-2013 at 09:42 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,426
    Quote Originally Posted by asamimasa View Post
    Just what I needed to know, thanks!
    You may find more here: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/leica/l...2/leica_m2.htm

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    261
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Actually ...

    The DIN and ASA standards were combined into the modern ISO standard. It continues to be correct to specify film sensitivity as 100/21 where 100 is the arithmetic sensitivity (as ASA was) and 21 is the logarithmic sensitivity (as DIN was).

    We most commonly see just the arithmetic part.
    A question just flickered across my frontal cortex: it seems odd that DIN should be a base 3 logarithm... is it associated with the dB concept that 3dB is the difference in amplitude that is detectible by the human ear..( I dunno, not a physicist)

    David

  9. #9
    Peltigera's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Lincoln, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    416
    I have a brand-new roll of Agfa Vista + in front of me and it states that the film speed is ISO 200 . 24ᴼ so the logarithmic DIN system is still in place on modern films.

    As I use a number of quite old cameras, I always use the DIN figure as the ASA system changed drastically in the late 1950s and meters from before then have DIN 21 equal to ASA 40, rather than ASA 100.

    It is not quite right to say that ASA was arithmetic and DIN was logarithmic (although that is correct) as the DIN system used (uses) a very different emulsion characteristic to measure film speed than the ASA system did. A large ASA difference in film speed between two films would not necessarily mean a large DIN difference. The DIN system (or degree part of ISO) measures a fixed density above the fog level while the ASA system ( and first part of ISO) is based on the gradient of the log exposure/density curve. It is at least theoretically possible for one film to be faster than another according to DIN and slower according to ASA.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    2,795
    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    load the film, crank off two blank frames while making sure the rewind knob is rotating backwards, THEN turn the film counter until it is pointing at one. TAke pictures, rewind film, lather, rinse, repeat.
    The manual seems to say close baseplate fire two blank frames then set counter to zero?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin