Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,916   Posts: 1,584,723   Online: 745
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 43
  1. #31
    Erik Petersson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    644
    Images
    8
    Thanks for your comments. I held a few Leicas and they felt fine in my hand. Haven't tried the others, Bessas, Voigtländers etc. I get the same feeling from my FED's, but the viewfinder is too small. That's why I think Leica.
    I want to get rid of most of my Nikons and Soviet cameras and think less about gear.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,551
    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    There is certainly a bunch of Leica koolaid floating around in this thread.

    For the record, in my experience Leica cameras are certainly wonderful pieces of equipment, but they will also require regular service and adjustment. Don't forget, the M2, M3 and M4 cameras were all built at least 30 years ago, some of them as long ago as 50 or more years. They are very old.

    The Voigtlander Cosina cameras are much, much newer. They have meters. Film is loaded in a more normal manner. They are very reliable and they cost far less. Are they as smooth in operation as a Leica? No. Does that make them less reliable? Who knows! They have not been around that long. Will they need adjustment at some point? Sure, most cameras do. Especially rangefinders. Nobody makes a rangefinder that will not eventually go out of adjustment, not even the sainted Leica. (See below.) Will they need repair more often? Who knows. There is anecdotal stories of Voigtlander Cosina (VC) camera needing repair in 12 to 18 months. I can tell you the same stories about Leicas. In fact, if you were to go on my experience I have never had to send a single one of my three VC cameras in for service, while having to have several Leicas repaired in the same time period. Does that mean anything important? Of course not. Your own experiences will almost certainly be completely different than my own.

    Leica makes great cameras and I love working with them.

    Voigtlander Cosina makes great cameras and I love working with them as well.

    If you find a good Leica, buy it. You will probably enjoy it. If you find a good Bessa R2 or R3 that you like, buy it. You will enjoy it as well.

    And if you are interested, Zeiss Ikon also made a terrific, modern M-mount rangefinder that is a wonderful camera.

    EDIT - The rangefinder in the Contax II is the only rangefinder built that I am aware of that will probably last for a very long time without adjustment. But by this time the glue holding the prisms together is about ready to start to deteriorate and fail, if it hasn't already. When that happens the secondary image disappears.
    Cosinas can be very reliable but if they fail they may need parts/modules Leicas can be the same but less likely normally shutters can be rebuilt from generic parts. The Cosina LTM &M lenses are solid workhorses.
    Leicas dont need regular service you can use them till they fail- my IIIc not been touched at least since '75, when I bought it, it is near 65 years old.
    ContaxII are not uber reliable the ribbons snap regular a Nikon S3 a better shooter.
    The Zeiss M is a Cosina module replace camera.

    The choice of a rangefinder is do you like the finder? Is the wind on ok?
    Subjective things but that is why people buy them.

  3. #33
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,192
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Cosinas can be very reliable but if they fail they may need parts/modules Leicas can be the same but less likely normally shutters can be rebuilt from generic parts. The Cosina LTM &M lenses are solid workhorses.
    Leicas dont need regular service you can use them till they fail- my IIIc not been touched at least since '75, when I bought it, it is near 65 years old.
    ContaxII are not uber reliable the ribbons snap regular a Nikon S3 a better shooter.
    The Zeiss M is a Cosina module replace camera.

    The choice of a rangefinder is do you like the finder? Is the wind on ok?
    Subjective things but that is why people buy them.
    Like I said, I love working with Leica cameras. And I love working with the rest as well.

    I have Leica cameras that have been working for a long time. I also have Leica cameras that seem to need adjustment every year or so. I am not personally sold on the reliability of Leica but that has been my own experience. Others have different experiences.

    In the end you pay your money and you take your chances. Fortunately for us they are all great cameras and we can have great fun using them.

  4. #34
    Erik Petersson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    644
    Images
    8
    Hi again. Found a nice M4-P for sale in Stockholm today. It feels solid, just one thing, the rangefinder does not line up at infinity. I guess that's easy to fix, but it stopped me from buying it. The asking price is SEK 5 000, which approximates to 554 Euro or USD 760, which feels just a little on the expensive side.

    I'll be grateful for any advice.

  5. #35
    Erik Petersson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    644
    Images
    8
    Another thing - the little waxed black dot above the lens mount did not have any engraving. Should I worry about that?
    thanks in ahead.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,551
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Petersson View Post
    Another thing - the little waxed black dot above the lens mount did not have any engraving. Should I worry about that?
    thanks in ahead.
    Id not worry about the dot only Leica service centres and a few repair people ever bothered.

    If you want the camera for shooting a horizonial error is focus error a vertical error is distraction - at least. Setting the rfdr is difficult some of the service people don't bother much.

    Lots of people set them on shelves in glass cases so there is a large premium on condition try to get a dinked shooter that has a 'bounce' noise at 1/15 and a clear and accurate rangefinder.

    An 3rd party M service (not Leica factory) in London is 120 GBP ... a factory is kidney.

  7. #37
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,192
    Images
    4
    If it were me I would just keep looking.

    When buying a camera that is already in good shape, where everything works when you buy it, you know that everything is in good condition at the time of purchase.

    When buying a camera that is already not working correctly, you are assuming that everything is in good shape and just needs an adjustment. You are probably right, but you could be wrong.

    A good one at the right price will show up eventually. Besides, this is allowing you an opportunity to learn those things that should be avoided.

  8. #38
    zeta3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    30
    Have a look in London first.

    Red Dot cameras.
    Aperture UK - near British Museum
    Robert White.
    There is place on the Strand near Waterloo bridge (I forget the name).

    If you dont get it serviced when you buy it, you will need a service within a few years. I prefer a service when I buy it.

    They are all good. My preference is M3 for 50mm lens. I have the .85 viewfinder on the M6 which is good for the 75mm and a .58 viewfinder on an M7 for wide angle lenses.

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    663
    Erik,

    I didn't see it mentioned yet but the earlier M3s had a film advance that required two strokes to advance a frame (because the Leica folks thought a single stroke would have enough torque to rip the film). Later serial numbers have a single stroke advance. The point is that the double stroke advance cannot be repaired except by replacing it with the single stroke mechanism-quite a bit more expensive. There is also some legend that seven digit serial numbers (1 000 000 +) are "the best" because...well, I don't know why. Maybe it takes the Germans a long time to learn how to properly build something they created. . Seven digits command a premium. My 979 xxx M3 has been fabulous. You might find the M3's viewfinder limiting as regards 35mm WAs but Leica made a quarter of a million of them so you'll run into them a lot as you search around. You're across that ocean but you might search/email Youxin Ye, a well known Leica repair/sales guy. He always has some cameras around and seems to be a pretty straight shooter. He CLA'ed my M3 before I purchased it (from another party).

    Good luck!
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  10. #40
    Erik Petersson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    644
    Images
    8
    Thanks everyone for all your excellent advice! And look what I found in London!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Leica.jpg 
Views:	48 
Size:	131.0 KB 
ID:	80075

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin