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  1. #51

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    a pair of needle nosed pliers and a file will do instead of a spanner wrench, big pliers for large rings, small pliers for small rings.

    You file the pliers ends for exact fit in ring...

    And take great care

  2. #52
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    yups, I know the method. For what I have to cope with, it's not sufficient, the ring is really stubborn. I've damaged it already trying to remove it, fortunately the glass is OK and I'm not in any kind of hurry to get the lens cleaned.
    Use the Force, Luke!

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    a pair of needle nosed pliers and a file will do instead of a spanner wrench, big pliers for large rings, small pliers for small rings.

    You file the pliers ends for exact fit in ring...

    And take great care
    A piece of sheetmetal ground/filed to clear the glass and fit into the spanner notches is a far better solution. I'll forgo taking something apart rather than use the pliers approach, it's no substitute for a spanner and a very good way to ruin both the pliers and whatever you are trying to take apart.

  4. #54
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    The camera, that my I61 L/D came with (FED 5), got a pool of water corroding the rear plate and rangefinder arm. In the rear plate there was a flake of rust pretty much like an ice on a pond when the water escapes or evaporates from underneath. So about a tablespoon of water slowly evaporated fro the camera. I was able to get the body into working condition and I've made a pinhole camera out of it and sold it as a post-apocalyptic marvel.

    The lens got a fungus inside, grub-screws are so badly corroded, I can't unscrew any but one. The ring holding the rear element rotates smoothly, but the front now looks like a pile of scrapings from under a lathe. The glass is still unharmed, which amazes me. I must have already damaged the thread the ring sits in. I've tried tapping and lubing.

    I've tried both methods, that is pliers and sheet metal, to undo the front ring. Pliers were otherwise never used, and they're not ruined by any means. And the tool I've made myself just bent in the very second it was confronted with the ring.
    I was able to clean the fungus from underneath the rear element, that's a good news. So now either it'll be sharp, or not, I'm not going to mess around with it. With the fungus inside it was a tiny bit better in ters of resolution, than collapsible I-22, but I've expected more.

    I'd rather hear more from Lamar, than babble myself
    Last edited by q_x; 12-11-2013 at 01:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Use the Force, Luke!

  5. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    A piece of sheetmetal ground/filed to clear the glass and fit into the spanner notches is a far better solution. I'll forgo taking something apart rather than use the pliers approach, it's no substitute for a spanner and a very good way to ruin both the pliers and whatever you are trying to take apart.
    The method used in a factory is a special pipe tool with two pins ground or inset to fit the ring notches and a handle at other end. Much less likely to slip when the piece is an inner ring as the pipe is sized to be constrained by the side walls. Similarly on an outer ring the pipe is just sized to clear the ring internally.
    A spanner wrench is a poor substitute.
    Not damaged anything yet with pliers.

  6. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    The method used in a factory is a special pipe tool with two pins ground or inset to fit the ring notches and a handle at other end. Much less likely to slip when the piece is an inner ring as the pipe is sized to be constrained by the side walls. Similarly on an outer ring the pipe is just sized to clear the ring internally.
    A spanner wrench is a poor substitute.
    Not damaged anything yet with pliers.
    Yes, I'm aware of that. But I'm not going to make a tool like that to use it once, unless it's for something important. I tried the pliers when I was a kid, ruined something, and now use simple improvised tools (for one-time applications) which have yet to leave a mark, much less damage anything. I also file screwdrivers to properly fit the slots in screws.

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by q_x View Post
    -snip-

    I'd rather hear more from Lamar, than babble myself
    Yes, I wonder what he's up to... perhaps taking pictures and developing film.

    We'll have to talk him into getting some more cameras and lenses...

  8. #58

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    I wish I was taking more pictures.......... Actually today I had to catch up with all the work that I got behind on the last two days because I was playing with my cameras. Real life intervenes with playtime yet again...... Based on yours and q_x's advice earlier (thank you to both of you) I decided it was best to keep the 3C. The seller gave me half the price I paid back since the slow speeds don't work. I think it is a fair deal. I did manage to work with the shutter enough to get everything from 1/25th and faster plus B working reliably. I actually put it in front of a little space heater fan to get it warmed up and that seemed to help even after it cooled back down to room temperature. I have a roll of film in it now but have only managed to get a few shots so far. I'm going look for a good repair service and price having it CLA'ed. I believe that is my best option, stick with these 2 bodies and maintain them. I feel a case of Russian GAS coming on though...... I ordered a Universal turret viewfinder last night........ Looking at 35mm lenses now too...... does it only get worse?????

    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Yes, I wonder what he's up to... perhaps taking pictures and developing film.

    We'll have to talk him into getting some more cameras and lenses...

  9. #59
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    Lamar, nopes, it doesn't get worse in my case. Only if you realize you're into photography, not photography gear history/service/collecting, you may be saved. There's nothing wrong with any hobbies though, so it's not a bad thing not to be saved in this regard

    10 or 20$ discount wouldn't make me happy about spending $75 to have a camera serviced, but if it's a good service, it's worth it, you'll feel the difference. I've once bought a cheap body for spare parts and was able to get 50% off, so it was 6$ in the end for a corroded Ricoh XR-1 - still working well at 1/8s and faster.

    I've recently sold nearly half of my gear, no regrets. Bodies, lenses, accessories, it was all gathering dust, so I've cleared the shelves, leaving only one operable SLR (plus body for spare parts) with it's lenses, one RF, one MF camera and I bought cheap backup SLR and RF.

    In my case, I've shot with every popular (= "I could try working with that") camera type on small and medium format, minus box cameras. Somehow I miss that single experience... If there's a box camera with tessar-like lens available very cheaply that I could work on, I'd be happy to read about it. Selling one camera to buy another, it took me some years, but after purchasing Moskva 5 I can say I've seen all I ever wanted, and then some... From plasticky amateur level and worse (Smena) up to pro, manual and AF SLRs... TLRs, M/AF viewfinder cameras, 35mm and MF rangefinders, 6x9 folders with frame and brilliant finders, pinhole cameras with no composition aids etc, etc... 90% of the time I can say "been there, done that" and I'm not curious any longer in the sense, that I think pushed you to check FSU RFs.

    Regarding MF, I haven't found a proper tool so far, but knowing what I know, I'd say Texas Leica will do the trick. I'm stuck with Moskva 5 till my life gets better - I still feel like it won't happen in Poland though, but I don't feel like it may happen for an immigrant in the west either, so I'm doing my best with what I have, where I am, and if I'm pissed off enough, I'm leaving to a place like Madagascar, Sumatra or even Tuva... I can't frame precisely with that soviet badass, that's the only real problem with Moskva. The shutter needs CLA, but it gets the job done as it is. And filters - well, I can hold a Cokin filter with my hand, it's not a big deal.
    I've sold Pentacon Six that needed to be serviced, to buy a Moskva and a tripod - eat a cookie, have a cookie...

    With 35mm film, I've finally settled on a simple set of cheap SLR bodies and lenses (I was afraid to get expensive gear out), mounts or brands doesn't matter at all, I'm rather interested in certain set of features and good tactile feel. I need tools unobtrusive and primitive enough to dream with, and haptic features, like the right tension on the shutter button or the right amount of force needed to wind the film, help here a lot. I'm feeling better with 410g (or 14.5 oz) of simplistic, mechanical body, than with ~700g of full-blown AF SLR, for example.

    If what I own won't cope with what I need it to do, I'm not addicted to luxury, I have a multitude of options. What's most important, I know quite well what photos I want to make. I keep FSU rangefinders as a trustworthy, but oversimplified backup.

    If I may put my 2 cents, Zorki 1, C or Fed 1 are worth checking out. Being a Leica clones, those are really smooth and compact cameras, completely different feel from Zorki 4, plus their tiny, dismal, 0.7x viewfinder actually helps to frame the image correctly. I've also had my adventures with a collapsible Industar, which is brilliant lens, though it surely retro or vintage in terms of IQ (but I've never left a lens cap on!). I've checked all major body types (Leica, Contax, hybrid FED and Zorki, fixed-lens Minolta, folding Moskva...). Zorki C feels best of all RFs, but I think I'll try Fed 2 someday, as it gathers all the failures of all the models: it's big, heavy, has fast shutter times only and it comes with an unhandy, large rangefinder and smallest shutter dial imaginable. If not this rude boy, I'm back to Kievs, as it's even more of a failure, I miss slow speeds doing strange tzzzz... and loose parts making clunk-clunk.

    I lack 35mm lens myself - not much in case of rangefinders (for the price I'd rather buy Oly XA and play with it), but with SLR. I have 35-80 and 24-55mm zooms and 50 and 28mm primes, so I'm not in a hurry to buy 35mm prime, even though I know it'll be my go-to lens. Now I'm taking more care to chose the right set of accessories and peripheral equipment properly and I'm shooting a lot of photos, so getting out when the light is right is my main concern. External viewfinder would be one more thing to fiddle with, a no-go for me. I know there's a proper Leica body for 35mm lens, so it's a matter of finding more things to be paid for...

    If you're thinking about Jupiter 12, be sure to ask about scratches on the rear element and buy only a lens, that comes with proper rear cap. The rest is a matter of good fortune.

    Cheers!
    Last edited by q_x; 12-12-2013 at 04:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Use the Force, Luke!

  10. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lamar View Post
    I wish I was taking more pictures.......... Actually today I had to catch up with all the work that I got behind on the last two days because I was playing with my cameras. Real life intervenes with playtime yet again...... Based on yours and q_x's advice earlier (thank you to both of you) I decided it was best to keep the 3C. The seller gave me half the price I paid back since the slow speeds don't work. I think it is a fair deal. I did manage to work with the shutter enough to get everything from 1/25th and faster plus B working reliably. I actually put it in front of a little space heater fan to get it warmed up and that seemed to help even after it cooled back down to room temperature. I have a roll of film in it now but have only managed to get a few shots so far. I'm going look for a good repair service and price having it CLA'ed. I believe that is my best option, stick with these 2 bodies and maintain them. I feel a case of Russian GAS coming on though...... I ordered a Universal turret viewfinder last night........ Looking at 35mm lenses now too...... does it only get worse?????
    You're correct about getting good gear and maintaining it, it's the only way - as long as you find a competent tech. The J-12 35/2.8 is a clone of the prewar Zeiss Biogon, and can be very good. I'm keeping an eye open for one myself. For me one of the attractions of Soviet gear is the lenses, many are clones of classic prewar Zeiss designs, albeit recalculated for Soviet glass types and given more-or-less modern coatings. As I indicated, I'm very happy with my J-8.
    Properly cleaned, lubricated with modern synthetic lubricants, and set up properly these Soviet cameras should perform as well and reliably as any camera. All you really need is an accurate shutter, accurate rangefinder, a decent lens and you're there. You can even buy a Summicron and screw it on, or any other screwmount lens - although you'll have to recalibrate the RF for non-FSU lenses if you want the Nth degree of accuracy from the RF at close focus & wide aperture. I'm sure I'll end up with at least one FSU screwmount body to compliment my Canon SIIb.



 

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