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Thread: Beater RF

  1. #21
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    My rc has a soft shutter release screwed in always and it helps a ton.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold View Post
    That's funny, I love the long travel of my SP and Canonet.
    Yes but it is a subjective thing some people like some dont, but there is more travel in the trapped needle system, so you get a exposure lock thrown in.

    The Yashicas with Aperture Priority arn't too wonderful.

    We are telling the OP the differences?

  3. #23

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    I'm very much a person that has to hold and play with something because the littlest thing can bug me. To that end I scored a good deal on a QL17 GIII with a sluggish shutter and a Olympus XA. I figure I'll play around with both of them and then sell the one I don't want. I'll also look into finding a good deal on the Oly 35SP or 35RC.

    The Canon 7 still appeals to me because it's decently compact and has interchangeable lenses. We'll see.

  4. #24

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    The Canon 7 is quite large. It's a bit bigger than a Canon P, which is more M size than Barnack... I would say the 7 is too big for a screwmount body, and the P is borderline. Not that either are big in the world of DSLRs, but I often bring my film M out instead of the P simply because I can use all my LTM lenses as well as M mount.

  5. #25

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    If you can, explain what you mean by "Beater RF" in the title.

    Do you mean that you want one that's worn? Or that you plan to treat it roughly?

    Personally, I wouldn't buy another beater. None of these cameras are rare, so there is no reason to buy one that's been mistreated.

  6. #26
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    If you do get the excellent Canon GIII 17 be aware of one thing that is very important. Cock the shutter and, as you are looking at the front of the lens, turn the aperture ring back and forth. If the aperture opens and closes WITHOUT hesitation you are OK. But if the tiniest bit of oil is on those blades you are in for trouble. This camera is especially vulnerable to this aperture blade hang-up, so beware.

    I have taken apart several and it is impossible for me to service one without destroying the GIII 17 electronic capability because the wires are amazingly close together and without any 'leg room', so I have to cut them in order to get the shutter/lens mechanism separated from the body. That means this: when I am finished there is NO meter and NO X sync, although the aperture now is excellent and the glass elements are pristine. It thus becomes a stellar 'available light' machine.

    The Olympus XA has a major limiting factor: there is no manual exposure provision, although a somewhat 'workaround' can be obtained with film speed and backlight provisions. Also, that shutter button is prone to 'delay' and that delay is not necessarily caused by dirt or debris. It seems, at times, to be a 'computer chip' problem that has never been satisfactorily explained to me.

    The Olumpus RC or RD gets my immediate approval. Those are great cameras with few problems. But watch for fungus on that front element. In fact, I would advise ALWAYS putting a clean skylight filter on ANY RF lens, primarily because it cannot be easily removed from the body, (unless you are talking about Canon 7 or such).

    But like all mechanical things, test, even without film. Be sure to put on Bulb setting with open aperture and, with opened back. fire at a well lit area to see how clear that glass REALLY is from BOTH the front and rear. You would even be advised to use a maginfying glass to closely inspect from both the front and rear while that lens is fired on bulb. (You might not like what you see but at that critical level, some dust problem can be largely ignored.)

    elekm: I think that by 'beater' he means one that has been well used, thus cheap. But, today, one can find surprising buys from even 'low mileage' cameras. Look, search, try, don't get frustrated. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 01-24-2014 at 09:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27

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    Thank you David, very useful information on what to look for when buying a camera. The giii I bought knowing it had a sticky shutter. The aperture blades are clean but the shutter blades are not. No problem as a friend has the tools to remove the ring holding in the front element. I'm going in that way and using some ronsonol to clean up the shutter.

    Sorry for the confusion over "beater". I meant merely a rangefinder that was well built and could take some abuse. Not that I plan on abusing it mind you but things happen.

    I have an XA on its way to me. I'll snag a RC or RD as the chance arises.

  8. #28
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Yes, that front element is easy to remove. But underneath that element is a second element that must be unscrewed, also, And that is a bit harder because there is no spanner wrench slots to turn that disk with. I usually drill tiny holes into that metal disk and then unscrew it. Doing that, you will finally expose the shutter and aperture blades. The rear lens elements (two) are also removable and doing that is probably the most sensible thing because drying will be far quicker and you get to clean those elements' innards.

    But, watch out and be careful: I honestly do not know if you are doing the right thing here. Certainly, the Ronsonol will dluite that grease but, WATCH OUT: that fluid will also travel down onto the helicoid and that means trouble because that helicoid (which determines focus) is full of grease and you do not want ANY grease coming to touch those aperture blades (which are guided by a very delicate wire spring. All I can say is 'only a few drops' onto those shutter blades and let it dry thoroughly (after firing a few times to get it worked in) before replacing the two front lens elements and rear elements.

    NB: to remove the ENTIRE lens/shutter assembly in the GIII 17 one has to use a spanner wrench on the large disk surrounding the REAR lens set. IMPORTANT: to loosen this large disk one has to turn that large disk CLOCKWISE which is counter to what is usual. After many turns, the lens/shutter assembly will be able to be removed, BUT...the wires are so closely tied to that assembly that you will not be able to remove it more than about one inch. THAT means that you cannot work on that assembly unless you cut those wires (or use amazing dexterity to cut, then resolder those damn wires).

    ALL smaller screws and disks turn normally to loosen (ie, turn counter clockwise to loosen).

    If you have questions, contact me either PM or 215.569.4949 - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 01-24-2014 at 04:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
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    my favorint of the fixed lens rangefinders is the canon ql17 giii. Youve held one so you know. The fit and finish of this camera is ecxellent. Really a step above the others.

    The Olympus 35RC is another one of my favorites. its smaller than the canon with a limited shutter speed but a nice sharp lens.

    The Oly 35RD is nice on paper, but it has similar shutter problems to the canon, and it is hard to service.

    The Oly 35SP is larger than the canon, but is probably the most fully featured of any of the bunch.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  10. #30

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    I have the XA in hand and I've got to say, the rangefinder patch is rather small and even after cleaning not that bright compared to the Canonet. Super small camera though.

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