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Thread: Canon G-III QL

  1. #31

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    Mine fires at all speeds, no battery, no film. I hate to say this...but I believe your shutter blades may be stuck.

  2. #32
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I run mine with no battery and I've never noticed a time when the shutter wouldn't cock and fire. I don't specifically remember trying with the film counter at zero or with the lens on A.
    f/22 and be there.

  3. #33

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    Please down load the manual and read page 11

    Which describes the shutter is locked in auto when the meter needle is in the red over or under exposure regions

    If you are in auto and don't have a battery fitted the needle will be in underexposure

    mine locks in auto with no battery

    But there could be a shutter problem.

  4. #34

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    Update

    Hey guys, I really took some time and looked at the rangefinder. It was on A mode. So I took it off that setting and shutter works perfectly, even slow shutter speed. Thanks for all the advice. Just need a new battery which saw that someone listed in this thread someplace and a foam job. It would be awesome if I could locate a lens hood 4 to go with it. Does anyone have one?

  5. #35

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    The filter thread is 48mm.

    Canon did two hood options

    clamp on series ring which accepted filters and hoods
    screw on rubber

    pretty rare animals

    Or you can use a step ring to 49mm, cause 48mm is rare.

    Any hood you fit needs to clear the rangefinder window so generic SLR hoods probably no good. Hoya and others made metal generics suitable.

    Post a wanna buy...

    Id get a uV filter as well or not clean the lens...

  6. #36
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    The third-party hood of choice is the Hoya 48mm black metal. Good shadowing and allows the use of filters. Minimal viewfinder encroachment. An eBay wait may be required to find one. Took me about six months, as I recall.

    A close second choice is the inexpensive Kalt 49mm black metal with a step ring adapter down to 48mm. This combination gives a much deeper shade without vignetting, but is only usable without filters. Add a filter and it just begins to cut off the corners. Noticeably greater viewfinder encroachment. Looks really cool when attached.

    Rubber hoods work, and are easy to source. Even in 48mm. But as most are designed to severely flare outward to make them usable with a range of focal length lenses, they seriously compromise the viewfinder. Skylight protection of the meter cell is also compromised. Good protection for bumping the lens, though.

    If you do choose to use the internal camera meter, it's almost mandatory to also use a good hood, since the meter cell is located directly above the lens for automatic filter compensation. Without a hood the bright sky will seriously skew your readings, possibly by up to multiple stops.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    The third-party hood of choice is the Hoya 48mm black metal. Good shadowing and allows the use of filters. Minimal viewfinder encroachment. An eBay wait may be required to find one. Took me about six months, as I recall.

    A close second choice is the inexpensive Kalt 49mm black metal with a step ring adapter down to 48mm. This combination gives a much deeper shade without vignetting, but is only usable without filters. Add a filter and it just begins to cut off the corners. Noticeably greater viewfinder encroachment. Looks really cool when attached.

    Rubber hoods work, and are easy to source. Even in 48mm. But as most are designed to severely flare outward to make them usable with a range of focal length lenses, they seriously compromise the viewfinder. Skylight protection of the meter cell is also compromised. Good protection for bumping the lens, though.

    If you do choose to use the internal camera meter, it's almost mandatory to also use a good hood, since the meter cell is located directly above the lens for automatic filter compensation. Without a hood the bright sky will seriously skew your readings, possibly by up to multiple stops.

    Ken
    You can lock the meter reading on 1st pressure of release for more refined readings.

  8. #38

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    You can use a hearing aid battery - Type 675 - to power the meter.

    Make sure you change the foam seals. The foam probably is a horrible messy goo that can end up on your film, on the lens and in various places in the film chamber.

    It also can end up on your clothing and on your hands.

  9. #39

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    Guide numbers in blue on aperture dial?

    I have been very pleased with my G-III. and tend to use it mostly with B & W film. I have yet to use it with a flash, although there are three numbers (14, 20, 28) in blue engraved on the aperture dial. I believe they are guide numbers, bit for what flash and what films?. They seem to be progressive, e.g. for ASA 25, 50 and 100 films. Does this make sense?

    A quick look at an online user's manual notes they are guide numbers for ASA films of 25, (?), and 800. I may be reading that wrong, but that looks like a misprint.

    I believe Canon produced a dedicated Canolite D flash for this series of cameras. Do those guide numbers relate to that flash?

    Thanks in advance for any input.

  10. #40
    zanxion72's Avatar
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    An easy way to calculate the f stop at the synch speed of your camera is f stop=guide number/distance from subject for ASA 100. Then compensate the exposure for the EI of your film.

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