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  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Does my Leica need a CLA or is it user error?

    Seems like most rolls i shoot turn out like the attached photo, sprocket holes as part of the image. it's kind of annoying as i lose image area. Is it me, do I need a CLA, or is it a loading error?

    Annoying, because it will look off with my filed carrier.
    This was shot with a Barnack (IIIA)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Untitled-33sw.jpg  
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
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    RIP Kodachrome

  2. #2
    Trask's Avatar
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    If you are using an earlier thread mount model like a III or IIIa, where the film is slid down into the back that does not open, then this can easily happen. If you're using an M3, M2, M4 etc then it's 99% user error for not properly aligning the film onto the film rails before closing the back and putting the bottom back on -- because with an M camera you can visually confirm that the film is properly installed.

    So I imagine you're using an earlier model. Leica insisted on the film leader being cut to an exact pattern so that, after having attached the leader to the take-up spool, you would insert the film cassette on one side and the take-up spool on the other, and there was no film coming out of the cassette that could catch on the lower (when the camera is upside down to be loaded) edge of the film gate. So step one is to trim the film leader properly. Possible stop two is to get a stiff yet this sheet of plastic that you can slide down into the camera as if it were the film, then slide the film itself down behind that plastic -- the plastic would ensure the edge of the film does not catch on the film gate/opening. I just loaded by IIIa yesterday, and to be certain it was loaded properly I removed the lens, set the speed to "Z" and clicked the shutter, so I was looking right at the film and could visually check that it was loaded. Since you are having difficulties, I suggest you load the film with the lens off and shutter locked open so you can watch the film descend, and you'll quickly see what I mean about the film catching on the edge of the film opening. You can gently put you finger on the film and work it down into proper position.

    I hope this helps. Remember -- even Henri Cartier-Bresson has exhibited photos where you can see the sprocket holes, so don't feel bad about your loading issue, as you're in good company!

  3. #3

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    My understanding it that's it's a fairly common problem with Barnacks. Figure out if the film is too far up or too far down in relation to the film gate. If it's not up far enough, the solution is easy: a little washer on the guide pin for the take-up spool on the base plate. If it's too far up, it might be a little more complicated. Without having a camera open in front of me I can't say for sure, but you might get away with shimming the top of the take-up spindle. I use thin plastic washers attached with rubber cement; no damage, easy to remove if need be. Completely reversible.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Any man who can see what he wants to get on film will usually find some way to get it;
    and a man who thinks his equipment is going to see for him is not going to get much of anything.

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    http://filmosaur.wordpress.com/

  4. #4
    jimjm's Avatar
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    My IIIF was doing the same thing, but the sprockets intruded at a slight angle. Film coming out of the cassette was positioned too low across the film gate, but less so as it neared the take-up spool.

    I glued a thin plastic washer to the inside of the base plate, directly under the film cassette. It supports the spool high enough now to solve the problem.

    If your take-up spool is slipping down, you may need to do the same for both sides.

  5. #5
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Dont worry , there would be always mistakes when you start with a barnack or hasselblad. I advise you to not use the camera at serious job until you learn how to load and use the camera properly. After 10 rolls loaded and shot properly , you can switch to these beauties , Do you tension the film from other roller or do you keep your eye open , when you turn one roller other end rotates , you are lucky because my first rolls always came blank 20 years ago. Best of luck , if your body damaged , you can buy from dag , sheryl kreuter or chinese guy with trading. By the way , your image quality is jaw dropping.
    ,___,
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  6. #6

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    It is not a mistake at all, it is simply the fact that Barnack bodies were designed around Leitz cartridges which are not exactly the same size (shorter) as those from today film manufacturers. The washer to offset the size difference as explained above is the way to go.
    Last edited by Dali; 04-30-2015 at 05:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "The problem with photography is that it only deals with appearances." Duane Michals

    "Only weak pictures need perfection." David Vestal

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dali View Post
    It is not a mistake at all, it is simply the fact that Barnack bodies were designed around Leitz cartridges which are not exactly the same size (shorter) as those from today film manufacturers. The washer to offset the size difference as explained above is the way to go.
    The Barnacks were designed before the DIN for cassettes the DIN is 2mm shorter than the Leics FILCA.
    The IIF and IIIF (and laster) had a enhanced base place to avoid the problem but still accept FILCA,
    The M are to the DIN, so dont accept FILCA, needing IXMOO.
    Think the FSU clones are ok.

  8. #8

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    With FSU, it is OK even if the image is not perfectly centered. (lack of) Manufacturing tolerance and soft body shell are the usual suspects in this case.
    "The problem with photography is that it only deals with appearances." Duane Michals

    "Only weak pictures need perfection." David Vestal

  9. #9
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    can ii mod my baseplate for proper function?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  10. #10

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    Hi

    The Soviets taught the Germans how to spell tank, sniper and play chess.
    The early Kievs are as good in every way as a ContaxII, nothing like as bad as a Contax I.

    Noel

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