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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will S
    Rangefinder images with BOTH superimposed AND split images are more accurate than superimposed images alone because the human eye can focus split images VERY easily. Unfortunately, only the Leica M's, CL, CLE, Hexar RF and Bessa R have this feature.

    Best,

    Will
    . . . as well as the Rollei 35 RF, Bessa R2, Bessa R2A, Bessa R3A, new Zeiss Ikon, etc.

  2. #12
    Peter Williams's Avatar
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    There is also the fact that there are no zoom lenses for rangefinders. For those SLR shooters that use them, the thought process that goes into framing a shot changes when using a rangefinder.
    If you can't answer a man's argument, all is not lost; you can still call him vile names.
    - Elbert Hubbard

  3. #13
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    Aside from the afore mentioned, very astute points, there is one that really appeals to me. Its an intangible, probably born of my love of gadgets and mechanical things: it just "feels" different. And to me, that alone is reason enough. I simply get in a different frame of mind behind an RF. Silly as it may sound, I find these type of "feel" issues can be really helpful when experiencing a "funk" or a creative block - grab a different camera, it will put you in a different mood, mabe you will make a picture you would have not otherwise made.

    Peter.

  4. #14

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    Besides the greater focusing accuracy with 50mm and shorter lenses, compared with an SLR, the biggest difference, for me, is shutter noise. With the Leica M, at least, the shutter is so much quieter it allows a totally different level of intimacy with the subject. Hard to explain, but people know you're taking pictures but you're not being intrusive about it. For this reason alone, I'm willing to put up with the framing inaccuracies and inability to focus on a moving subjects that SLRs do so much better.
    Take care,
    Tom

  5. #15
    Will S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Duffy
    Besides the greater focusing accuracy with 50mm and shorter lenses, compared with an SLR, the biggest difference, for me, is shutter noise. With the Leica M, at least, the shutter is so much quieter it allows a totally different level of intimacy with the subject.
    I got to test an M3 a few days ago and I was surprised how loud the shutter was. Nothing like my F100 of course, but my Petri 7s (sadly now defunct) was a lot quieter. I've heard so much about how quiet these are I was expecting it to be almost silent. Of course, it could have just been this camera.

    I'm waiting to compare with the R3A I just ordered.....

    Thanks,

    Will
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

  6. #16
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Making the transition from rangefinder to SLR was indeed hard for me. Some of the things I found difficult were:

    1. Hard to cope with the increased SLR noise level.
    2. Watching the SLR image disappear when I pressed the shutter release button.
    3. Difficulty focusing the SLR when using dark filters.
    4. At first, not seeing the need for any lens longer than 100mm or wider than 35mm for a 35mm camera.
    5. It took me even longer to see any value in a zoom lens.
    6. The higher cost of the SLR did not seem worth the expense.
    7. Lack of trust in the SLR viewfinder image. For some reason, I equated the SLR viewfinder image with smoke and mirrors.
    8. Preferred the rangefinder viewfinder image that showed subject activity occurring outside that portion that would be captured on film as opposed to the SLR viewfinder image that was restricted to only what would be captured on film.

  7. #17
    kaiyen's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure the Petri uses a leaf shutter. Using a leaf shutter without a mirror is a great combination for stealthy, quiet work. My Retinae are quiet enough for churches, and my Canonet is barely any louder. The focal plane shutter in a Leica, in comparison, will be louder.

    allan

  8. #18
    Will S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiyen
    I'm pretty sure the Petri uses a leaf shutter. Using a leaf shutter without a mirror is a great combination for stealthy, quiet work. My Retinae are quiet enough for churches, and my Canonet is barely any louder. The focal plane shutter in a Leica, in comparison, will be louder.
    That explains it. I got the Bessa R3A (about 11am in the mail) and it sounds about as loud as the M3 to me. Maybe a tad quieter. Would have to compare them side by side to be sure.

    The viewfinder on the R3A is eerily bright. And keeping both eyes open is really cool.

    I am very happy right now...
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

  9. #19
    frank's Avatar
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    If the Bessa sounded a bit quieter than the M3, then there was something wrong with the M3.
    Art should unsettle the comfortable, and comfort the unsettled.

    My photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  10. #20
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jvarsoke
    Ralph Barker mentioned that SLR and Rangefinder shooting styles differ and not everyone makes the transition kindly.

    I shoot both and yet I'm not sure what the statement refers to. Anyone wish to clarify?

    (didn't want to pollute the other thread)
    When you shoot an SLR, you are looking at the little groundglass inside the camera and watching that. When you see a picture, you push the button.

    When you shoot a Rangefinder, you watch the world. When you see a picture, you lift the camera to your eye and push the button.

    If you think there is a difference, there is a difference.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

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