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  1. #1
    meltronic's Avatar
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    Retina identification question

    Hi. I have two ID questions about this camera, and one service question.

    1. What is the broken thing projecting from the side of the shutter housing? It has some kind of spring loaded brass plunger coming out of it, and it's clear that something has broken off the top of the rod. See picture 1.

    2. What is the geneology of this model? Pictures I've seen lead me to believe it's a type 010, but there are some minor variations. Mine has a viewfinder that seems to be a separate piece, rather than integral with the entire top plate. Mine has an Ektar lens rather than the Schneider lens I see in pictures of other 010s. See picture 2.

    3. The frame counter and top shutter release plunger are unreliable. The frame counter dial doesn't always spin when the film is advanced, and the shutter release doesn't set. They seem to be connected. Anyone know how difficult this may be to repair? At the moment, I'm spooling the whole roll of film onto the take-up spool, using the rewind knob to "advance" the film (because the counter dial moves perfectly in reverse), and using the shutter release on the shutter itself rather the one on the top plate.

    Thanks for any help you can offer.

    Matt
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails retina1.jpg   retina2.jpg  

  2. #2

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    Looks like a type 149 - Retina I prewar. Not imported into US by Kodak.

  3. #3

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    meltronic
    The post on the side of the shutter is the old locking flash connection.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #4

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    I have the same flash connector on my Zenobia. Anyone know where to get a cable to fit that type connector?

  5. #5
    meltronic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmann
    Looks like a type 149 - Retina I prewar. Not imported into US by Kodak.
    Okay, I've done some research, and found that it's actually a type 148. It has an Anastigmat Ektar rather than the type 149 Retina Xenar.

    There's a great list of models at the link below.


    http://www.wctatel.net/web/crye/retina.htm

    Thanks for your responses!

  6. #6
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    The "broken thing" is an ASA type bayonet flash connector. Paramount will make flash sync cords that mate to this.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  7. #7

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    These retinas are such beautiful cameras. I have had the pleasure of working on a few.

    I know nothing about em as a collectors item and hardly ever see em for sale. Are these Retinas worth anything or important as collectors or rare? They are such beauties, almost like Leicas some of em.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  8. #8

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    I have several retinas. The 3c has a six element 50/f2 xenon that is incredibly sharp. The leaf shutter is quiet, and vibration free. The 2a has the same lens and same shutter. The results from these cameras is just stunning. No mirror slap, no focal plane shutter kachunking away. Dead quiet with beautiful results. They have often been called the "poor man's leica", but in 1954, my 3c retailed for 179.95. I also have a 1b with a four element 50/f2.8 xenar with zone focusing. Its results are also outstanding. These cameras are starting to bring higher prices as collectors and photogs realize the quality fo the cameras and the images they produce.

    A friend of mine is a leicaphile. He also collects retinas. When asked what camera gives the best consistent results between his M3, M5, and Retina 3c and 2a, (all rangefinders) his answer is sure to upset a lot of leica owners.

    Did I mention that they fold up and fit in a jacket pocket?

    Note that most retinas count backwards for the film counter. They show how many frames you have LEFT, rather than how many you have taken. The film counters have to be manually reset when new film is loaded. A google search will turn up the particulars for any given model regarding any quirks each model may have.

    ps. you can buy an adapter for that bayonet flash sync for regular pc flash.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  9. #9

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    If you look at the link in Meltronic's post above, you'll find there are lots of different models of Retina. Some rare, some common as mud. I believe they were a significant camera in the development of high-end hobby photography, and of course were the quality end of Kodak's 35mm camera line.

    I will second ricksplace's opinion about the 50/2 Xenon, particularly post-war coated versions: a killer lens. It never disappoints me.

    Retinas were not built to professional gear standards. They won't take the abuse that a Leica will take. The later models, the ones where the shutter is cocked by the film advance, have a famously delicate part, the "cocking rack" that causes great trouble. Getting the later ones (or the Retina reflexes) worked on nowadays can be problematic. However, there are tons of the immediate post-war model II (types 011 and 014) around for sale on eBay, they have simpler mechanism and the Xenon, and are probably the best bet for a practical shooting camera.

    And yes, they are quiet. They make a Leica sound like a gunshot. But, that's true of any camera with a Synchro Compur, you can make the same statement about a Rolleiflex.

    Jonathan

  10. #10

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    You could have either the Model 148 or the Model 010, which was produced after World War II using various prewar and wartime parts. Likely, it's the 148, although the 010 is nearly identical. The 148 and 010 have two lugs on the film counter dial, which yours appears to have.

    The 010 had EK before the serial number. The 148 had no such designation.

    There were so many variations of each camera that it makes it really difficult (and fun) to try to figure out which model it is. Some cameras were sold only in the U.S. Some cameras were sold only in Europe.

    The probelm with the shutter release sounds like a lubrication issue.

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