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  1. #1

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    Leica M frame spacing.

    I'm just curious whether or not a Leica M could be adjusted to give greater than normal spacing between individual frames, and if so, to what extent?

  2. #2

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    No idea, but also curious, why should you want to? It would just cut down the number of frames per film.

    David.

  3. #3
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    I would think doing so would require major modifications to the gearing. The easy solution would be to shoot blank frames with the lens cap on between the "real" shots.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft
    No idea, but also curious, why should you want to? It would just cut down the number of frames per film.

    David.
    The poster may tell us his reason but I for one can think of a reason. I find the spacing to be so small that getting the guillotine to cut exactly half way between frames when cutting into strips of 4 or 6 is difficult. Often I have too much blank on the end of one strip and none at all at the start of the next. This despite having a combined guillotine/ light box which is specifically for 35mm film cutting.

    I can always get 25 frames out of a 24 frame film and would gladly sacrifice the 25th or even 24th frame, come to that, for slightly bigger spacing.

    Pentaxuser

  5. #5

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    1) I end up chopping up my film rolls quite a bit and it would be a lot easier to handle single frames with a tad bit more margin.

    2) Night shooting: I sometimes have highlights that bleed through the film base disturbingly close to adjacent images.

    3) And no laughing please: I'm am very, very interested in 35mm DBI and would like to be able to cut a frame out of a roll in low light. Shooting a blank between lighting situations is probably the ticket though.

  6. #6

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    ...despite having a combined guillotine/ light box which is specifically for 35mm film cutting...

    ...ooooh! Where do I find one of those?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MMfoto
    ...despite having a combined guillotine/ light box which is specifically for 35mm film cutting...

    ...ooooh! Where do I find one of those?
    I am pretty certain these are still made new but the sources I am thinking of are in U.K. A company in the U.K. called SpeedGraphic( No connection with Speed Graphic cameras) advertise them for sale

    Kaiser make them. Not cheap if new. E-bay or secondhand suppliers are both possible sources

    Pentaxuser

  8. #8

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    The Leica (and I believe most cameras) are designed so that if you cut between the sproket holes you will never cut picture area. I hand cut over a light box (the backlight is helpful. I start the sissors in the correct spot between sprocket holes and make a slight cut in the right place; I then line up the blade with other side of the negative, and make the cut. Even freehand, I've never had a problem.



 

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