Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,735   Posts: 1,515,466   Online: 1088
      
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567
Results 61 to 68 of 68
  1. #61

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    Quote Originally Posted by Biogon Bill
    No, firecracker, I'm not a manufacturer's rep. Far from it. (chuckle)

    I have not experienced any problems with finder alignment. I haven't heard of many & don't really expect to. Among the quality control procedures that Carl Zeiss AG instituted at Cosina is an inspection of each camera before it is boxed to leave the factory. Mine came with a certificate, signed by the quality assurance inspector who checked the camera. Rangefinder misalignment is an obvious problem that can easily be caught by such a check. The rangefinder is a delicate instrument which can be knocked out of alignment in shipping. Even Leicas experience this problem new, out of the box. Such problems should be rare.

    I have no idea about the durability of this camera. Only time will tell over the long run. It seems well made to me & I haven't experienced any problems in 6 months of use. In use for back packing, it's light weight should be an asset. However, this is the kind of circumstance in which Leica's heavier duty construction would also be an asset. Everything is a trade-off. If I were taking the ZI back packing, I would make sure that it is in a well padded case - as I would with almost any camera I would carry in such a circumstance.

    My lenses with this camera include CV, Leica, & Rollei as well as the ZM 35/2 Biogon. My longest lens is a CV 75/2.5 & my heaviest is a chrome 50/2 Summicron. Balance feels fine to me with all of them. The heavier weight of a Leica M is usually described as an asset in taking hand held shots at slow speeds. However, the balance between camera shutter & the pressure required to release the shutter is a significant factor in this regard. The Leica shutter has considerable resistance built into it. Its depth of travel is 2.0 mm. The ZI shutter's depth of travel is less than half that - only 0.9 mm. This balances perfectly with the lighter weight of the camera, but offers sufficient resistance to prevent premature firing.

    Two little publicized quality points for the ZI: immediacy of response matches a Leica M - only 14 ms of shutter lag - and the range/viewfinder is better than a Leica with no flare & no rangefinder parallax as well as being brighter, having more viewable frame lines, & having a longer effective base length for a finder with 28 mm frame lines.

    A ZI & an M7 both have their advantages. For me the viewfinder of the M7 was the selling point, but you can't go wrong with an M6 or M7 either.
    Thank you very much for your writing. I think I've got a good view on the camera.

    Now I just have to find a friendly camera shop to actually let me press the shutter button only once!

  2. #62

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tijeras, NM
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,246
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_troll

    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft
    Sorry for ignorance and being a bit off topic, but what is "trolling"?

    David.
    art is about managing compromise

  3. #63

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New Jersey (again)
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,952
    Having owned an M6 and IIIf, the Zeiss Ikon is a very different camera.

    The one pitfall that longtime Leica owners stumble into is approaching every camera from a Leica point of view. Often, there is this a needless feature-for-feature breakdown.

    The Zeiss Ikon design is somewhat derivative of the M, although you could say that most cameras are derivative of earlier designs.

    I would have liked to have seen Zeiss develop a camera that more reflected the Zeiss Ikon designs of the past while incorporating some new features than try to do a variation of yet another Leica M. But then, Zeiss didn't ask me to design the camera. Nor did I expect them to.

    On the other hand, the one time that Leica tried a radical move away from the M (the M5), it seems that users largely rejected the camera. Hence, the return of the M4 as the M42 and then the M4-P, the M6, M7 and MP and all of the collector's editions past, present and future.

    The handling of the Zeiss Ikon is very nice -- excellent balance, great viewfinder and a film advance that might be too smooth. The comments about the backlatch baffle me. To open the back, you must make a conscious effort to push the latch in an "L" pattern with moderate force. I can see no situation where the back would open accidentally by bumping the latch. And it doesn't protrude from the body far enough that it would catch on something.

    Some of my backs for the Rolleiflex SL66 use a similar latch and have never opened accidentally. It's a very good design. Simple to use and secure.

    The use of plastic is kept to a minimum and in areas where it makes sense: takeup spool, the cap that covers the PC connector ... I think that's about it, although certainly there probably are more plastic parts.

    The back is very stiff with little to no play. Zeiss used a more expensive labyrinth design and avoided the use of foam seals. That means nothing now. In 20 years, when foam seals are ruining other cameras and leaking light, the Zeiss Ikon will continue shooting (hopefully) as well as it does today.

    As far as long term longevity? Who knows? Certainly, the Yashica/Kyocera Contax cameras continue to be highly regarded, and those weren't even Zeiss-branded products. Carl Zeiss goes to great lengths to protect its reputation, and I don't believe it would release a subpar product -- especially with its first foray into camera bodies.

    Check out the Zeiss Ikon site and pay particular attention to the torture chamber. Zeiss appears to have done considerable testing in the lab, as well as out in the field before the camera went into production.

  4. #64

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rochester, NY/Toronto, ON
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    559
    As a former owner of Rollei SL66 bodies and backs (3 each), I can echo the comment for the latch design. Those who slag it know bull-c#$p.
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  5. #65
    butterflydream's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Korea
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    192
    Images
    31
    I wouldn't buy this camera because I already have Leica m and prefer it, but I really appreciate Zeiss and Cosina that they still make film camera.

  6. #66
    titrisol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rotterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,671
    Images
    8
    PS the look-ma-no-seals was common in the old ZXeiss Ikon cameras. So that is a nostalgic touch IMHO
    Even the prewar Nettar and Ikontas didn;t have those and they keep working fine after many many may years.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  7. #67

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tijeras, NM
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,246
    I think use of seals is a sign of cost cutting.
    I think in this case using light traps is applying quality where it counts.

    Quote Originally Posted by titrisol
    PS the look-ma-no-seals was common in the old ZXeiss Ikon cameras. So that is a nostalgic touch IMHO
    Even the prewar Nettar and Ikontas didn;t have those and they keep working fine after many many may years.
    art is about managing compromise

  8. #68

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New Jersey (again)
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,952
    I've felt that use of foam seals is to compensate for an inferior design and inadequate light trapping. A correctly designed back shouldn't require foam seals.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin