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  1. #21
    rfshootist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimgalli View Post
    My perspective is that of one with no experience or history in 35mm rangefinders who was surprised that they are not as freeing as all the legendary hype had led my uninitiated mind to believe.
    This freeing myth, well.... :rolleyes: As most myths this is a disappointment too when it comes to the reality check.
    The RF concept was beaten completely in the 60s by SLRs, and there were good reasons for that successful change.

    BUT the SLR concept isn't free of severe compromises, and that helped the RF Concept to survive in a niche.

    There are several environments and situations, where the RF concept still beats the SLR hands down. If you ever have seen how easy and reliable you focus a fast lens in low light you will hardly use a SLR for that ever again, neither AF nor manual..
    As a 35mm photog one should have both options IMO.

    Regards

    Bertram
    A la recherche du temps perdu: www. bersac.de

  2. #22

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    Rangefinders v. SLRs. SLRs to me are telephoto, zooms, and motor drives. The rangefinders are mostly used with 35mm lenses, although the older ones do not have the framelines necessary. The Canon 7 should have the framelines for the 35mm. My Canon P does. Rangefinders work well on the street and tighter places. The don't have the loud sounding shutter of the SLRs. As for weight I don't know about the 7 but my P is heavier than an M6 or a Nikon S series. I think I read that you have a 35mm lens. You should do very well.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    I reach into my camera closet, grab my 7s and my M2, and head to the kitchen to use our digital scale. Tale of the tape: 7s is 640 grams, M2 is 575 grams, both without body cap but 7s with battery. So a difference of 65 grams, which is equal to about half the weight of a later generation screw mount Canon 35mm lens. Not significant. I'd go for whichever fits you better. My M has better fit and finish, though the Canon is very good -- and I do like the fact that the metal shutter curtains in the 7s cannot be burned through by sunlight through the lens. As with all aspects of photography, results have more to do with the photographer than the camera used.
    Don't forget the additional weight of the lens. A modern Leica standard 50/2 lens (black) weighs 240 grams, the standard 50/1.8 lens for the Canon 7 weighed 290 grams. So, the total package is 815 g for the Leica, 930 g for the Canon 7, or about 14% heavier.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Bellayr View Post
    Rangefinders v. SLRs. SLRs to me are telephoto, zooms, and motor drives. The rangefinders are mostly used with 35mm lenses, although the older ones do not have the framelines necessary. The Canon 7 should have the framelines for the 35mm. My Canon P does. Rangefinders work well on the street and tighter places. The don't have the loud sounding shutter of the SLRs. As for weight I don't know about the 7 but my P is heavier than an M6 or a Nikon S series. I think I read that you have a 35mm lens. You should do very well.
    howza bout macro?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    howza bout macro?
    Leica solved that long ago when SLR meant an Exacta. However, macro work with a Leica is inconvenient and expensive. SLRs do have a few advantages!

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    Leica solved that long ago when SLR meant an Exacta. However, macro work with a Leica is inconvenient and expensive. SLRs do have a few advantages!
    Thanks for explaining why I bought a Nikkormat instead of a Leica and a Visoflex back when. The Leica-Visoflex combination seemed distinctly second-rate in comparison.

    Come to think of it, I used to know people who did a lot of macro work with their Exaktas. None of the Visoflex owners I knew back then actually used them. OTOH, at the time there were already serious Leica collectors whose goal was to own at least one of everything.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    Thanks for explaining why I bought a Nikkormat instead of a Leica and a Visoflex back when. The Leica-Visoflex combination seemed distinctly second-rate in comparison.

    Come to think of it, I used to know people who did a lot of macro work with their Exaktas. None of the Visoflex owners I knew back then actually used them. OTOH, at the time there were already serious Leica collectors whose goal was to own at least one of everything.
    Dear Dan,

    I'm still using my Viso -- on an M8 as well as on 'real' Leicas. And the Viso has held up better than the Nikkormats, which I also own.

    Cheers,

    R.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    Dear Dan,

    I'm still using my Viso -- on an M8 as well as on 'real' Leicas. And the Viso has held up better than the Nikkormats, which I also own.

    Cheers,

    R.
    Its good to know that there's an exception. Roger, do you use your Viso with mobile subjects?

    Cheers,

    Dan

  9. #29

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    Dan, why do you even post in an RF forum? You truly look foolish.

    The first Visoflex predated the Nikon F by about a decade. It's intended purpose was to extend the capabilities of existing RF camera for macro work on tripod and often used mounted to a microscope.

    Are there better tools today? Absolutely and hopefully with the DSLR or SLR firmly mounted to the tripod.
    Last edited by Solinar; 02-06-2007 at 09:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #30

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    Y'know, Solinar, I do a fair amount of macro work with a handheld SLR and flash illumination. The right tool for mobile subjects, IMO. And I do a bit of macro work on 2x3 with a press camera that happens to have a rangefinder. Its for static subjects, sometimes lit with flash, sometimes with available darkness, and always focused on the ground glass. For macro focusing through the lens is slightly important.

    And yes, I am slightly acquainted with copy stands. Also with devices for attaching camera bodies to microscopes; all of them are second-best to microscopes with cameras built in. If I had the money I'd own a Wild Photomakroscope (or current equivalent).

    Finally, I'm acquainted with Exaktas. One of my aquarium photographer friends, unfortunately now dead, started with a Contax (RF, not an SLR from the dark side of Zeiss or a rebadged Yashica) in about 1937 and got lousy results until he discovered Exakta in, IIRC, 1949. He got good results with a lowly Tessar, later got better results with a Macro Quinon.

    As far as I'm concerned the Visoflex converts a first-rate RF camera into a third-rate SLR. Same goes for the mirror box attachments for Contax RFs. Not everyone agrees with me.

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