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  1. #61
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cotdt View Post
    But the purpose of ultra-wides is macro, not to fit in a big scene. A 28mm is enough for most such purposes.

    Rather, the purpose of an ultra-wide is composition. You usually have a near object and it's background, so close focus ability is essential and rangefinders are just bad at that.
    Eh? Most of my wide street shooting has been with a CV 21/4 or a Zeiss 25/2.8 - can't think of a single one off the top of my head where I felt impeded by close focus limitations.

    I don't think anyone mentioned the handholdability of RFs - it's like built in VR - I regularly go down to 1/8. But the RF aesthetic is just different from SLRs - either you like it or you don't. You can only quantify and objectively compare so much.

    -A

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu View Post
    Eh? Most of my wide street shooting has been with a CV 21/4 or a Zeiss 25/2.8 - can't think of a single one off the top of my head where I felt impeded by close focus limitations.

    I don't think anyone mentioned the handholdability of RFs - it's like built in VR - I regularly go down to 1/8. But the RF aesthetic is just different from SLRs - either you like it or you don't. You can only quantify and objectively compare so much.

    -A
    I agree, I shoot a lot (landscapes, other wide angle nature and street scenes with my CV 21/4) and have not felt restricted or impeded by close focus limitations).
    Last edited by Tom Hoskinson; 07-13-2008 at 12:01 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Grammar
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #63
    kivis's Avatar
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    Use of a leather half case has made the shutter much more quiet.
    Akiva S.

    Nikkormat FTN, Nikon F, Nikon FE, Leica M3

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kshapero/

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  4. #64

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    The Zeiss Ikon is a very nice camara. The view finder is bright and easy to see through. I have used mine in very bright and dim light situations and I always find it easy to focus. The Bessa is indeed a lot cheaper but the zeiss mechanics works very well. The only thing I do not like about it is the amount of shots you have to do to fill a roll of 24 or 36 and the small negative size, but this has nothing to do with with the camera, or any camera. However, for the same price or cheaper you can buy a nice mamiya 7 second hand. If you do not mind 10 frames, I like it, and can live with one or two lens options, than this might be a more economical choice . One thing the zeiss is a faster camera. You really can not go wrong with that camera. Sometimes you can find them second hand as well; check b&h, keh, or the classified ads at the range finder forum.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrey View Post
    *Rambling alert!*

    I've had one more canon body stop working on me last day. This left me without a "good" film system. I have a couple of bodies here and there with random 50mm lenses on it, but no wides, no teles in one package.

    Now I am rethinking my equipment history and the cost/benefit ratios of the equipment I bought.

    From that, considering I am not a heavy user, any new body I probably wouldn't be able to wear down.

    I regret not buying the FM3a while it was still new at BHphoto. I almost pulled the trigger on it, but then decided to buy into Canon FD. A wonderful journey filled with shutter squeaks, erratic bodies and ruined shoots.

    I don't want to bother with fully mechanical cameras anymore. Just like mechanical watches, they're largely a thing of the past. I want to know what time it is, and quartz does quite a good job.

    So, I want:
    1) an electronically timed shutter
    2) easily accessible batteries
    3) a new body that is currently manufactured

    Bessa seems one obvious choice, but I don't see the real quality in it. 600 bucks for a camera is cheap.

    New leicas are out of the pricerange.

    Zeiss Ikon ZM seems like a good choice and fits the bill. It only costs as much as a prosumer DSLR and seems to have a decent viewfinder specs at .72 magnification, which I need for my wides.

    It seems I have found my cam.

    Does anybody have one?
    Hi Andrey

    Google is your friend you can search for negative threads as well as +ve, e.g.

    http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...ad.php?t=97349

    I prefer manual cams but do use ZM and CV rfdr lenses, they are ok.

    Noel

  6. #66

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    Hi Andrey,

    I've used the Zeiss Ikon ZM for shooting street life and portraits in New York. And now extensively for a year in the field in India.

    The positives.

    1. The rangefinder patch is sharp and snaps into focus if you position your eyes directly behind (easy with practice).
    2. The rangefinder baselength is high. On my sample I have never had focus issues with any lens upto 50mm f1.4 at their widest apertures. I have had a sample of a Bessa R3A camera where I simply could not get sharp negatives with a 50 Sumicron and a 50mm f1.5 Nokton. The Nokton would work perfectly on a Bessa R. So you might want to check user reports of variability if you go the Bessa way.
    3. The exposure lock button is well designed and very useful in real life. The meter is quite accurate in practical use when used in conjunction with the AE lock.
    4. Lightweight compared to the leica's. Yet reasonably solid.


    The negatives.

    1. The shutter is louder than a Leica M. This can be attenuated by using a leather case for the Leica M3 (easily available used) which fits the Zeiss Ikon perfectly.
    2. The film rewind button is kind of flimsy. I doubt that this will matter, but I do wind the film slower as a precaution.
    3. After a few months of use in the field in India, my sample started draining the batteries out within a single roll unless turned off and back on for every shot. After a few such rolls the electronics went offline. This was fixed by a local repair person and has not reoccurred since. Do note that field conditions here include extreme heat, dust and humidity.

    The final test for equipment is whether I would buy a second Zeiss Ikon ZI when needed.

    I would.

    - Santanu

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