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  1. #11
    Suzie Place's Avatar
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    Manual use of Minolta Hi-Matic 9

    I just got a Minolta Hi-Matic 9. I would like to use it without batteries in manual mode. I plan to shoot full body shots in dim interior light. I have very little understanding of the lens barrel settings. Did I mention that I am a bad and inexperienced photographer? I don't understand where the calibrations begin or end, not to mention their meaning.

    All I want is to manually shoot full bodies in poor interior light. Later, I might want to shoot automobiles in sunlight, or beach shots.

    I love classic cameras! They make me feel like I'm in a James bond film from the 60's. Like "You Only Live Twice". All I need is a Datsun Fairlady and I'll be good to go!

    I also just bought a Minolta SRT 101, but I like the Hi-Matic 9 because it can be used manually.

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG. You'll fid a lot of other "bad" and mad photographers here, some badder than others

    Post a few images once you've shot a few bodies please. . . . . .

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 10-25-2008 at 01:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    Suzie Place's Avatar
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    Manual operation of Minolta Hi-Matic 9

    I would like to use my Minolta Hi-Matic 9 without batteries. I want to take full body portraits in poor interior light hand held.

    I don't know where to set the rings on the lens barrel. In fact, I don't really understand what the rings represent. Will it even be possible to take portraits in poor light: i.e., a couple of 60 watt light bulbs?

    The lens barrel is lose, but the shutter functions.

    I also have a Minolta SRT 101. Will it function without batteries?

    I've read the Rangefinder VS SLR argument. How does the debate relate to my specific need for close range portraits in low light?

    I'm in love with the Minolta Hi-Matic 9. But I'm not sure why. But long live classic cameras nevertheless!

  4. #14

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    Hey Suzie,that won't be possible. It uses what's called a programmed autoexposure.

    That means, depending on the film speed, the light meter selects from a preset range of shutter speeds and apertures.

    There is only one way to get around this, and I don't know if it's true with your camera. You sometimes can set the exposure dial to the flash symbol (usually a lightning bolt). That sets the shutter to 1/30 of a second. Then sometimes you choose the aperture you want.

    But that's not always an option with this genre of cameras (1970s rangefinders).

    Otherwise, you'll want yet another camera that allows you to select shutter speed and aperture. The Olympus 35 RC is one of these. And if you go a bit further back in time to the 1950s and 1960s, there probably are a hundred different models (or more) from which to choose.

    And that is how many of us end up with a lot of cameras -- more than we need.

  5. #15
    Chaplain Jeff's Avatar
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    ...
    I also have a Minolta SRT 101. Will it function without batteries?

    I've read the Rangefinder VS SLR argument. How does the debate relate to my specific need for close range portraits in low light?

    ...

    Hello,

    Yes, the 101 has a mechanical shutter and will work without batteries. You just won't have a light meter. If you don't know how to gage light - especially indoor low level light - I'd suggest you use the meter though.

    I may have missed it, but why don't you want to use a battery? If it's the issue of needing a mercury, you can use a modern battery and adjust the ASA dial to compensate, or buy one of the fancier alternatives instead.

    Regarding the 101's use in low light - depends on the lens. An SLR will not shoot as at slow a shutter speed as an RF typcially, but you can purchase a lens like the Rokkor 58mm, f/1.2 to use with it.

    Jeff M

  6. #16

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    Let me adjust this what I wrote previously:

    The meter selects from a preset, fixed combination of shutter speeds and apertures. Most of these cameras don't have speeds slower than 1/30 of a second.

    Sometimes, there is only one way to get manual exposure, and I don't know if it's true with your camera. Some cameras have a flash symbol (usually a lightning bolt). That sets the shutter to 1/30 of a second. Then sometimes you choose the aperture you want.

    Alternatively, some cameras have a "B" setting, which keeps the shutter open as long as you hold down the shutter release. You can then guess at exposure. Best used when the camera is on a tripod.

    Not all cameras offer both or either of these options.

  7. #17
    Suzie Place's Avatar
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    Manual Function of RF Minolta Hi-Matic 9 and SLR SRT 101

    I wanted to go battery-less because I assumed that for my specific need, it would be a simple matter to set the focus, diaphragm and shutter. Thus, there would be no great need for automatic features. I thought that light levels are fairly predictable for experienced photographers. Maybe I was presumptuous. Also, I do believe that the self-timer on the Hi-Matic 9 works only in manual mode.

    I must add that my needs have changed. I want to use the self-timer on a tripod for full length portraits in a well-lit room (seven or eight 60 watt bulbs) with good window light.

    I went to butkus.com and found out which ring is the shutter and which ring is the diaphragm. I assume that "diaphragm" means aperture? But I still don't know where the gauge numbers are set from---where they begin or end. For that matter, I don't really understand the settings on the focus ring. I see the lighting bolt on the diaphragm ring, but I don't know where to line it up.

    Do I want depth of field on a portrait shot? I don't think I do.

    I had an SLR 20 years ago and did well. But I don't remember anything.
    What speed film do I want for the full length portraits?

    To recap: I assume that for full length portraits with tripod and decent light, it would be a simple matter to preset the shutter and aperture on the Rangefinder Minolta Hi-Matic 9? If so, what would those settings be?

    Also, if my SLR Minolta SRT 101 does not require a battery, then why is my viewfinder totally dark? There is no film in the camera. I tried loading it but I mangled the film.

    I appreciate your help so far!

  8. #18

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    reasons for dark SRT viewfinder

    The SRT battery only makes the light meter needle move and performs no other function whatsoever.

    If the SRT viewfinder is dark, either you have the mirror locked up, or the mirror is sticking up for some other reason. To manually raise or lower the mirror, twist by 1/4 turn the chrome knob beside the lens on the front of the camera below the speed selector.

    Perhaps a more important question you should contemplate, is what lens you want. It's the lens that makes your pictures, not the camera body.

    I also have both an SRT and a Hi-matic. For on-tripod, posed shots, I would tend more towards the SRT. Rokkor lenses for it are a steal right now on ebay, so get the right one for the perspective and bokeh you want to achieve.

  9. #19
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning, Suzie Place;

    Nice to see you on this forum also.

    If you look at the earlier postings on this topic, you will see that the Minolta Hi-Matic 9 is a fairly versatile camera. Mike Elek has described its fully automatic mode (what is now called a "program mode") when you set both of the lens "rings" to "A." When you move the lens rings to settings other than "A," you put the camera into a "shutter priority mode," an "aperture priority mode," or a fully manual mode. There is a line on the lens barrel you align the selected lens aperture and shutter speed with to choose them.

    If you leave the aperture or diaphragm ring (the one with 1.7, 2.8, 4, 5.6, et cetera) on "A" and set the shutter speed ring to what you want (fast speed for stopping action?), with a battery in the camera, the camera will choose the lens opening for you; "shutter priority mode." If you leave the shutter ring (the one with B, 1, 2. 4, 8, 15, et cetera) on "A" and set the aperture ring to what you want (depth of field perhaps?), with a battery in the camera, the camera will choose the shutter speed for you ("aperture priority mode". If the camera cannot set the speed or the aperture to something workable for the selected setting you have chosen, the light meter display in the viewfinder will tell you. You might need to interpret this display for the subject and the lighting condition to determine validity.

    OK, the last case: With both rings set to a number (not to "A"), you are in full manual mode. You are in charge. If there is a battery in the camera, the light meter needle will tell you if it thinks the exposure is correct when the needle points straight out horizontal toward the block. If you are using an exposure guideline or an external meter, you can choose what you want that matches that lighting exposure value (EV).

    The self timer is the little metal tab or lever that sticks out through a slot in the side of the lens. You move it to "V" to arm and wind up the self timer. The normal shutter release button starts everything just like normal.

    Yeah, my lens sections seem to be a little loose also. If I do not bump them, or push them out of alignment, everything seems to work.

    Well, with these comments and your copy of the Minolta Hi-Matic 9 manual, you may have enough to get started. Put a roll of film into the camera, try out the various modes, and see how you like them.

    On the subject of the dark SR-T 101 view finder, Steve has already suggested looking at the mirror lock up dial, although I do not think that the SR-T 101 has a mirror lock up. I think that was on the SR-T 102. If there is a small round dial on the right side of the lens mount below the shutter speed dial and shutter release button, try rotating that dial from a position slanting up away from the camera front to a position slanting down away from the camera body. If you take off the lens and look inside the camera, normally you should see the front surface of the mirror. If you see the cloth focal plane shutter behind the rectangular mirror box, there may be a problem with the mirror being stuck in the up position. If that is the case, then we might need to arrange for a telephone call to discuss the procedure to try.
    Last edited by Ralph Javins; 11-07-2008 at 03:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I left out a whole sentence.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  10. #20
    Suzie Place's Avatar
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    Thanx Everyone

    I shot my first roll on the Minolta Hi-Matic 9. They are great and I am so pleased. I got the Minolta SRT 101 ready to go.
    For some strange reason I've got the whole neighborhood lined up to pose for shots. I guess they could sense something I suppose. Perhaps it was those stainless steel big lens cameras I've been carrying around.

    Another question: I shot the last roll in fair light. Many places I shoot have miserable light. How low can I go? Light that is. Perhaps I should consider Black and White film. How low can I go with that?
    Last edited by Suzie Place; 11-07-2008 at 10:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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