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  1. #31

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    With that camera, why limit yourself to that one lens, especially that one.
    I would have one of each length and another body like the the R3 or R2, to cover the longer lengths.
    If I were you, I'd also make room for me.
    :rolleyes:
    Have Fun!
    Brian
    My "Personal" Photography Website...

    "Photography is an act of Life" - Maine 2006

  2. #32
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey A. Steinberg View Post
    Olympus OM-1 or OM-3TI with 24, 50 and 85mm lens. That should do the trick and be light and give you DOFP.
    The OP asked for RF suggestions and DOFP is highly overrated. The SLR won't do many things an RF will.

  3. #33
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu View Post
    The OP asked for RF suggestions and DOFP is highly overrated. The SLR won't do many things an RF will.
    Most (an understatement only to avoid being absolutist) rangefinder lenses have DOF scales to cover you. You can also test your own personal limits for the print size and viewing conditions you prefer, and bias up or down a stop or two on DOF using these scales. A pre-focused or hyperfocally set lens is a real advantage for quick shooting. Many experienced RF photographers learn to "read" focus from a lens tab (an advantage of those kinds of lenses) and get close enough for DOF coverage or for a minor eye-level adjustment even before raising the camera.

    Lee

  4. #34
    MPandolfo's Avatar
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    I had exactly the same dilemma some months ago while planning a two month trip.

    Remember also that, unless you make partial shipments to home during your trip, you will have to carry all your films (or negatives) back to home. I came to the conclusion that the best way to assure you will have enough space (and weight allowance) to carry everything back to home is to carry from the beginning all the loaded cartridges you plan to use, then develop at home. Same size and weight that goes, comes back.

    In terms of space, you will not save a lot carring bulk film cans. Each 100' can occupies a volume similar to 12 film cartridges, each can renders 18 36exp. rolls, so your gain would be the volume of six (18 minus 12) cartridges per each can. The bulk film loader has a volume equivalent to maybe 30 cartridges, so it will "eat" the volume gain of five 100' cans. (Let's assume that, at the beginning, you will carry the empty cartridges inside the bulk loader). In other words, five 100' film cans plus a bulk loader will use the same space as 90 individual film cartridges. If you plan to shoot no more than 90 36exp. rolls, then is more efficient to carry the preloaded cartridges.

    My advice is that you carry all the film you will use in leaded bags, without the boxes and plastic cans. Carry some plastic cans to be used to protect the film during your day trips.

    Moreover, develop and scan during your trip ? Possibly you will get better quality and price at home rather than abroad.
    Carrying a bulk loader and film drums ? Remember security inspections at the airports, on a recent trip (in Europe) my case was opened twice by security services without me been present. No harm in my case, but bulk film cans look pretty suspicious.
    Doesn't sound as a good idea to me.

  5. #35

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    If you want to take landscape and docu images I would say 25/28-50 is the critical FL range. Just a 50 would be hugely limiting to my mind and if restricted to one for everything it would be 35. At least the r4 has lines wider than 35mm, but the 50 would be tiny.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by disfromage View Post
    The only thing I feel qualified to comment on is that I think you might feel limited by only having one lens. I would consider something wider and perhaps a longer lens also. My do everything 35mm rangefinder kit is 21mm, 35mm, and 75mm.

    Richard Wasserman
    This is my experience also. I've been traveling with rangefinders for about 35 years.

    I'm currently on the road with a35/75 combo,and really wish I'd brought my 28.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by MPandolfo View Post
    My advice is that you carry all the film you will use in leaded bags [...]
    I've heard talk that the lined bags are invitations to inspections and additional travel hassle, possibly including rescans of the contents outside of the bags. It's not clear whether these are field reports or pure speculation. Anyone with experience using these bags in travel care to comment?

  8. #38
    Chaplain Jeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John W View Post
    I've heard talk that the lined bags are invitations to inspections and additional travel hassle, possibly including rescans of the contents outside of the bags. It's not clear whether these are field reports or pure speculation. Anyone with experience using these bags in travel care to comment?
    Hello,

    I used the film bags quite regularly immediately following the attack on NYC in 2001. What I learned is that the bags will only help you if you're prone to forgetting to ask for hand inspections of film - because a lead bag is going to arouse interest and lead to a hand inspection. Any lead-lined bag is going to be taken out and the contents will be hand inspected for radiation and powder (explosives) residue. Not a big deal, as that's what I have them do with film anyway.

    The nice thing about RF as opposed to film SLRs when travelling - and I'm not sure this makes sense, but has been my experience - is that TSA folks tended to look suspiciously on my Nikon F4e / F5 and big lenses, even after inspecting them. When the answer to the question, "Is this a film camera?" was yes, they would frown and call over an assistant to go through the camera bag as if it were full of illegal drugs or explosives.

    When travelling with the M3 / M5, I have always been greeted with smiles and comments such as, "You don't see these much anymore. That's really neat." I don't know what the difference is, but my camera / camera bag / film searches are always faster and friendlier when travelling with RF.

    One time I showed up at the x-ray booth 45 minutes before my flight with an F4e, F5 and a Domke bag full of lenses on my way to Disneyworld. When I asked for a hand inspection, the senior employee stated, "If we do, you'll miss your plane." The inspectors kept me at the table looking over my gear until long after my plane had boarded. When they finally let me go, they laughed that I'd have to catch the next flight. Had my wife not stood in the doorway of the plane with our 11 month-old in her arms begging the flight attendants to give me another minute, I would have missed it.

    All that to say, RF is an easier way to travel for lots of reasons. I don't carry the lead bags anymore - it was just one more thing to keep up with. Were I prone to forget, I would use them rather than let my film get x-rayed. The lead bag is more to keep you from forgetting - because if you use the bags, they're going to check it. If you use them, make sure you give the inspectors time or you will miss your plane.

    Jeff M

  9. #39

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    I'd also recommend shipping your exposed film home, just so you don't have to lug it about.

    As far as gear recommendations, whatever you end up taking, spring another $350 for the Cosina 15mm lens. It's really tiny and relatively inexpensive and might get you that shot that you'd miss with out it. That's true of any lens, sure, but I've found in my travels, there's always plenty of great scenes where there just isn't enough room to back up enough to capture it all with a 35, or a 24, or a...

  10. #40
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by disfromage View Post
    The only thing I feel qualified to comment on is that I think you might feel limited by only having one lens. I would consider something wider and perhaps a longer lens also. My do everything 35mm rangefinder kit is 21mm, 35mm, and 75mm.

    Richard Wasserman
    Nah, you got it all wrong!
    The perfect travel kit is the one I use: 21mm, 35mm & 90mm...
    ;-)
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

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