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  1. #31
    nicefor88's Avatar
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    I used the Summicron 50/2 which to me is excellent+
    But I preferred the 35/2 which is more versatile, you can take portraits in situation, not really close ups (still, this is open to discussion). The aspherical version is extremely good and I think you could find one for ca. 1000$ if lucky (I got mine for 1200$ on ebay Germany where prices generally are higher than on the US market).
    As for bodies, I would go for a Leica M if I were you. M4/M4-P or M6 if you prefer to have a built-in meter.
    RF is great, I don't mean it's better than SLR (I use Nikon F3 too) but it is smaller and I attract less attention which is an advantage with street scenes (my #1 subject).

  2. #32
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I would go for the CV Nokton Classic 40mm, and spend the change on another lens.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  3. #33

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    If you wish for a lens which draws consider a collapsible with clean glass. The ridged is reported to be slightly better, up close & wide open. With any 50 year old optic it comes down to which has the cleanest glass. Both 50s have a sharp/smooth look with great OOF effects. The earlier cron at F2.0 may have too low contrast for average pictures but between 2.8 and 4.0 the "classic look" is there. The collapsible cron was HCBs prime lens throughout his career.
    RJ

  4. #34
    thomasw_'s Avatar
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    Go to the M-mount group on flickr. You can select your lens based on a comparative rendering analysis.
    I suggest the summicron collapsible....superb lens, a classic, proven performer for a reasonable cost.

    If you go with a 50, I would recommend a M3 over a M4 for a few reasons.

    1. higher magnification finder ,91x. the effective base length is higher which makes focussing more accurate than the M4's ,72x magnification.
    2. cost. you will find user M3s can be found for a few hundred less than user M4s.
    3. positive film loading. folks pay more for the m4 tulip film loading. but the m3 loading to a clipped spool is quick enough --- I mean we are working with a film RF here, try to get a little more contemplative and philosophical --- as well as being very positive. Once the film is in, you are sure it is advancing. The M3 method is not a hindrance, it is a feature It takes but a few seconds longer than the tulip catcher of the later Ms. No biggie.
    4. Clean solid framelines. So simple and beautiful.
    5. The VF is brighter.
    "A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within." W. Durant

    flickr

  5. #35
    Chaplain Jeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    I would go for the CV Nokton Classic 40mm, and spend the change on another lens.
    Yeah! Or the Summicron / Rokkor 40mm lenses. Great lenses at a ridiculous price. You'll be amazed at how good they are, especially considering what they cost.
    Jeff M


    M3, M5, CLE, Minolta XE7, Minolta Maxxum 9, Minolta Maxxum 9000, Nikon F3HP, etc., etc.

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