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  1. #41
    bowzart's Avatar
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    I thought I had posted to this thread. I guess I just thought about it.

    Back in the olden days, when knights in shining armor... I shot a lot of public events, under all kinds of conditions. I would use the Leica unless there was some reason (like needing close ups) to use the Pentax. With the Leica, it was left eye; with the Pentax is was right eye. I must be ambinocular.

    Unless I was shooting fast moving events in the dark. Like street dances. Then, I would use both eyes, but wouldn't look through the viewfinder at all. In the above mentioned situation, I would set the focus, then move with the subject keeping the camera moving with them, using my arm to keep the right distance as well as give me the point of view I wanted. This involved projecting a mental frame out from the camera onto the scene and envisioning it from wherever the camera was. Actually, I was dancing with the subjects when I did this. You know, if you've ever tried to use a Leica in the dark, especially with moving subjects, how useless it is to try to focus. But not just with Leica; with anything. What's needed is to keep the camera moving with the subject, and hold it at the right distance, since speeds are slow and dof is limited to inches. Also there are tricks like if it's a couple dancing, it might help if they are both the same distance, which means "in line".

    Paul Berger, photo prof at University of Washington, told me that he sometimes blindfolds his students and puts them in an enclosed place where they all photograph each other. It takes some about ten minutes to figure out that you don't need to hold the camera in front of where your eye would be if it weren't covered.

  2. #42
    jamesgignac's Avatar
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    Yes, both eyes sometimes...depends on the composition, lens, distance to subject, etc...it's also somewhat more fun that way and I do more casual shooting in this two-eyed manner or when I need to keep myself very aware of my surroundings.

    Wow - I tend to do the same as bowzart - the 'aware of my surroundings' and 'casual shooting' comments basically referred to the same thing - dancing. I like my rangefinder when I'm out with friends and there's lots to be seen in all directions.

    On another note I also sometimes don't bother looking when I'm shooting with my old Agfa folder...just set the distance, press the button, trigger a flash to freeze it...ta-da.
    -dereck|james|gignac
    dereckjamesgignac.com

  3. #43

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    Ikodot

    If you want to keep both eyes open and use different focal lengths you could have a look at this little gadget.
    <http://www.ikodot.com/takealook.html>

  4. #44

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    My eyes don't work together. I don't really have depth perception either. Most doctors say I have either two dominant eyes or no dominant eye. Depending on where I'm looking, one eye is "doing the seeing" while the other is aimed in that direction, but not really doing much. If I had both eyes open, I think I'd just get confused, so I close my left and look through the viewfinder with the right. One of the really nice things about rangefinders is that I can see what's outside the frame (as long as I'm not using my 25mm), something I could never do with my SLR.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    Paul Berger, photo prof at University of Washington, told me that he sometimes blindfolds his students and puts them in an enclosed place where they all photograph each other. It takes some about ten minutes to figure out that you don't need to hold the camera in front of where your eye would be if it weren't covered.
    All the digital P&S users know this, none of them hold the camera in front of their eyes!

  6. #46
    clayne's Avatar
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    Leica Technique -- both eyes open?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Puccio

    All the digital P&S users know this, none of them hold the camera in front of their eyes!
    Yes but they use auto-focus. Big difference.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

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