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  1. #11

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    For a 40/50mm lens it's hard to go wrong with Leica,Canon,Voigtlander lenses.
    The 40 Voigtlander and Rokkors are very compact but are more money than an(old) Leica 50.
    If you use filters though the Rokkor uses Series 5.5 that aren't all that common.
    M3 is .91 viewfinder magnification, M2/4/ is .72 & later can be found with .58/.72/.85
    You had your choice.
    Although I have an M3(.91) now, I really prefer the .72 finder it's much easier to see the entire 50mm frame than with the M3. I've also got a Canon Vl & I think it's 1:1 but its very squinty to view through. Haven't used a Bessa so, no experience.

    I focus & compose with both eyes open & find the .72 the most comfortable & am probably going to get rid of the M3.
    Last edited by John Koehrer; 05-16-2010 at 12:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  2. #12

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    "I've never shot a Leica. Or even held one. Up until today, I still wanted one though. I thought that a rangefinder would be a superior camera for anything but macro and long lenses...or 99% of my shooting. "


    Nb that those who like rangefinders like them a lot, but retro cache aside, most people can't stand them in practice-- there's a reason Contax, Nikon and Canon stopped making them-- most people prefer slrs.
    best to get something cheap but good like a olympus 35rc to find out if you like it, before you lay out for a big lump of German brass.

    There are focus magnifiers for the leica .72 finders that give you a life size or near life size image with longer lenses.

    My experience has been that shooting with both eyes open is a better idea in theory than in practice because pictures that look great in 3 dimensions don't work as two dimensional prints-- when you have both eyes open you are not seeing the scene same way the camera lens does. The real advantage of a high magnification finder is that you get more focusing accuracy relative to rangefinder base length, less eye strain and perhaps a little more low light visibility than with a lower magnification finder.

    The idea of looking beyond the framelines is also overstated -- if you have a camera stuck to your face you aren't really watching what's going on around you regardless of how many eyes you've got open. The trick is to be able to anticipate interesting stuff before it happens and have the camera ready -- it's having framelines in your minds eye that's more important.


    All this said I've got a bessa r3a and It's got a great finder. Hard to see the all of the 40mm framelines at the same time( not that big a deal really ) but the 50 is fantastic

    I've Also got a topcon re slr which is life size with the 58mm normal lens and it's great too.

  3. #13
    phaedrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpberger View Post
    The idea of looking beyond the framelines is also overstated -- if you have a camera stuck to your face you aren't really watching what's going on around you regardless of how many eyes you've got open. The trick is to be able to anticipate interesting stuff before it happens and have the camera ready -- it's having framelines in your minds eye that's more important.
    That I feel different about. The few pictures I've made with rangefinder cameras that I couldn't have made with a SLR have depended on that split second, almost subconscious decision to press the shutter NOW, when the composition falls together just so. And you know when you got it, because you could see it while the camera took the picture, you weren't blinded by the mirror going up. Working a lot, you could perhaps anticipate the moment with a SLR, but the reinforcing moment of having seen it is priceless.
    Sorry to be gushing so ...

  4. #14
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I suppose what I need then is an R3m. A 40mm lens suits me just fine. What's an inexpensive 40 or 50mm lens that fits this camera? I don't have high lens standards, and any old lens that works will probably be fine for me.
    That is my rangefinder setup: R3M with CV Nokton 40/1.4 lens. Superb combination, and very unobtrusive on the street.

    Many of these were taken with the 40mm (others with an Apo-Lanthar 90mm)
    Last edited by Andy K; 05-16-2010 at 06:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  5. #15

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    Andy,
    Thanks for the link, thanks for sharing. Terrific images.
    Regards,
    Dave

  6. #16

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    Hi

    A M3 or Canon P near !:1 finders are ok but even with a M2 or Kiev if you leave the other eye open your brian can cope with both images without needing a restart.

    This allows you to see things approaching like an auto in peripheral vision, or see around a lens hood, or if the details in the shot are below acuity, at 0.7 through the finder, look at them 1:1 with other eye.

    It is simple don't close the other eye, you are doing it wilfully.

    Noel

  7. #17

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    I agree with the above^ except my brian can't seem to cope.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #18
    jmcd's Avatar
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    Just a word for the P—a superb camera, very well made. If you are content with screw mount lenses and external meter, it is hard to beat.

    Another option is to use a Voigtlander metal viewfinder in the cold/hot shoe on the camera of your choice. It offers a 1:1 view that is just brighter than normal eyesight.

  9. #19
    arealitystudios's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    That is my rangefinder setup: R3M with CV Nokton 40/1.4 lens. Superb combination, and very unobtrusive on the street.

    Many of these were taken with the 40mm (others with an Apo-Lanthar 90mm)

    same here, though mine is an R3A. Same thing in terms of general design, image quality, etc. The viewfinder is quite a treat and the combination makes for an amazing street shooting tool.

    I wouldn't give up that 40mm Nokton for anything.

  10. #20
    photoncatcher's Avatar
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    Ok, maybe I,m weird, but I always keeo both eyes open when shooting out side. I also keep both eyes open when sighting a fire arm (long time ago). I suppose I learned how to do it out of a sence of self preservation when shooting all my Daughters sports. You really do not want to get blind sided by either a field hockey, or lacrosse ball. For street photography, it's good to know who, and, or what is getting close.

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