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  1. #11
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Oh, gotcha. The Noctilux is certainly an impressive lens, but for the quality and speed it produces at that cost, I'd say nearly anyone would be just as happy with a more reasonably priced f/1.2. I mean, afterall, that's 1/2 a stop... c'mon!

    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #12

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    There is a lot of snobbery out there surrounding Leica in particular. A subset believe anything beyond what Henri Cartier-Bresson is just in the way of 'pure' work.

    Ignore it. Take good pictures. The results and the pleasure you get using it are all that really matters.

    The R2A is a better camera than any rangefinder I've used. If you find that you don't 'click' with it, sell it and try something else.

    Edit: Opps, I was behind on the thread. lots of clarification in the last few minutes.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    Time spent tweaking film exposure and processing technique is worth more than expensive lenses or cameras. Most prime lenses from prestige manufacturers will produce stunning results in terms of contrast and sharpness, but only if you've optimised the craft end.
    Agreed. A bit daunting though, developing a love of chemistry. But that reservation aside, it's sound advice.

  4. #14
    clayne's Avatar
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    rbenari, I was only referring to the noctilux which is actually just not tha great a lens.

    When you pull your tri-x out of the tank and see the negs everything will come full circle and you'll understand entirely.

    Don't forget the most important aspect of all: the light.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #15
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    noctilux which is actually just not that great a lens
    It is a very specialized lens designed for night shooting in cities. It is optimized for minimum coma when used wide open. By this criteria it is a great lens. For everyday picture taking it is the wrong lens to use and a complete waste of money. Most are bought for snob appeal.

    The Nikon version:

    http://imaging.nikon.com/products/im...kkor/n16_e.htm
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  6. #16
    clayne's Avatar
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    Nicholas, the light falloff of the noctilux is what makes it not that great a lens in my opinion. Coma is one thing, but if your lens is f1 in the center only it's just playing number games.

    One could buy a noctilux or they could buy a nikkor 50/1.2 for 300$ and achieve 99% of the same goal. Of course it wouldn't have that "OMG look at the bokeh!" feel that snobs pay the 5k$+ price for, but they aren't photographers anyway.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #17
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    One could buy a noctilux or they could buy a nikkor 50/1.2 for 300$ and achieve 99% of the same goal. Of course it wouldn't have that "OMG look at the bokeh!" feel that snobs pay the 5k$+ price for, but they aren't photographers anyway.
    Touché!

  8. #18

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    And if you want more contrast without developing/pushing mainstream film yourself then try some alternatives. Fomapan can be very contrasty (too much sometimes) even with normal development times. You'll get more contrast out of that film than by spoiling $$$ into Leitz glass IMHO. At least you'll get it cheaper :-)

  9. #19
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    Personally, I am a total newbie, but I find that a using a compensating developer (HC-110) and a mild agitation scheme (10 seconds every minute) on a film stock like Tri-X 400 or HP5+ give me great contrast. Depending on the grain size you want (which will be relatively larger on a 35mm frame) you may want to try a slower film like Acros 100, which is my personal favorite.

    And I'm shooting primarily through a Konica Auto S2, so a f/1.8 Hexanon 45mm lens. I love it.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

  10. #20
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    HC-110 isn't really a compensating developer as I understand it. Are you using it strongly diluted?

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