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  1. #11

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    I would never use a TTL metering anyways... No matter what camera.

    But that's me.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    and shooting with it a bit (almost two rolls), I'm a bit frustrated.
    I just wanted to pick up on this and say that less than two rolls of film (only one roll has developed/printed) is a little less than 'shooting with it a bit'. A new system takes a while to master and I think early frustrations are part of any new thing. It took me a lot more than two lessons to learn to drive.
    Steve.

  3. #13
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon koss View Post
    I am not a Bessaphile, but usually if you are in Aperture Mode, then you pick the aperture setting and the camera takes care of fussing with the shutter speeds! If you are fussing too, then it may be compounding your problems. Only in Manual mode would you leave the aperture at a certain setting and then saw away at the shutter speed dial until the meter arrows behave themselves. Are you with me here?)Best,
    Jon
    Oh yeah, I'm with you. Unfortunately, the Bessa R3M is all manual ergo the fussing with the shutter speed dial. The Bessa selects nothing. And I agree, pre-planning would make shooting with the R3M much more manageable. With my Minolta X-700 and Canon ELAN 7E, I can concentrate on composition while in AE mode. Not so with the Bessa.

    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    I just wanted to pick up on this and say that less than two rolls of film (only one roll has developed/printed) is a little less than 'shooting with it a bit'. A new system takes a while to master and I think early frustrations are part of any new thing. It took me a lot more than two lessons to learn to drive.
    Touche! I agree.

    It will be interesting to see how these first two rolls turn out.

  4. #14
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    This is all great advice.

    I'm in the same boat you are. I've used SLRs since I picked up a camera for the first time some 25 years ago. I got an M6 since it seemed a direction I wanted to go in.

    It was tough at first, with the same basic issues you've mentioned. The focusing does get easier, but it's different. Hyperfocussing or whatever it's called is the key. And it does get easier to do with time...I usually focus at a distance I use most often and then can quickly adjust closer or farther (assuming my DOF doesn't do that for me)

    The metering, well...that's not a rangefinder-specific issue. I use the meter in my camera but use it specifically...I focus on something I know is roughly 18% grey in tone; in a pinch I meter off my palm and open up a stop. Many people use an external meter and I will do that too, soon as I can afford a good one.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

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  5. #15
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    I figure I missed about a half dozen possible shots due to fiddling and trying to get a meter reading that was not too over/under exposed
    Sounds like you need to do what I do with every in-camera meter, and that is to ignore it. Why would you let a possible shot be missed because you were fiddling with the meter? The meter doesn't know anything about photographs. Take the photographs. Ignore the meter. Be happy.

    Unfortunately, the Bessa R3M is all manual ergo the fussing with the shutter speed dial.
    Why are you fussing with it? Can't you decide what shutter speed you want to use? This doesn't sound like a camera problem. You should already have decided what shutter speed you want to use before the picture needs taken, and it should already be set. It sounds like you are fiddling with the shutter speed dial because you are afraid to take the picture unless the meter tells you it's OK. Here's a hint: you can use whatever shutter speed you want. That's the point of a manual camera. If you are only going to set the camera to match what the meter says, then you might as well shoot in Program mode. The point of manual is that you use whatever settings you decide you need to use, not that the camera decides to use.
    Last edited by BetterSense; 11-08-2010 at 07:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #16
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    That's the point of a manual camera. If you are only going to set the camera to match what the meter says, then you might as well shoot in Program mode. The point of manual is that you use whatever settings you decide you need to use, not that the camera decides to use.
    I know the difference between aperture and shutter priority and manual modes and fully automatic. I didn't realize RF's had Program Mode. And even if it did, I wouldn't use it.

    Every camera is different. Whether it means using hyper-focal distance focusing, or setting aperture and shutter speed and ignoring the meter; some process of adaption to a different camera is gonna take place. I'm simply attempting to learn how this particular camera and its optics performs and/or responds and make the necessary adjustments to get the best from it.

    Maybe it would help if you had a CV Bessa R3M in your hands and could look into its viewfinder. Then you might get a better sense of what I'm trying to convey.

    This is my first RF -- I'm learning how to use it O.K.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    ... if you had a CV Bessa R3M in your hands and could look into its viewfinder...
    BTW, I touched on this earlier, but are you enjoying all of your peripheral vision with both eyes open? Do you notice how much easier it is to track your surroundings and 'anticipate' the shot?
    Last edited by David William White; 11-08-2010 at 10:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by David William White View Post
    BTW, I touched on this earlier, but are you enjoying all of your peripheral vision with both eyes open? Do you notice how much easier it is to track your surroundings and 'anticipate' the shot?
    Old habits have a way of lingering. Still doing the one-eyed pirate thing I'll have to work on keeping both eyes open.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Oh yeah, I'm with you. Unfortunately, the Bessa R3M is all manual ergo the fussing with the shutter speed dial. The Bessa selects nothing. And I agree, pre-planning would make shooting with the R3M much more manageable. With my Minolta X-700 and Canon ELAN 7E, I can concentrate on composition while in AE mode. Not so with the Bessa.
    You get used to this, I think. In situations where the lighting is fairly consistent, I find it takes very little time and even less attention---meter and preset to the "typical" lighting, whatever that is, nudge one of the controls up a half-stop or a stop if the particular subject is darker, down if it's brighter, and occasionally glance at the meter for confirmation. It sounds like a lot of steps, but in my experience the Bessae have good ergonomics for this style of shooting and it becomes automatic quickly.

    Unlike some posters, I don't have a principled objection to TTL metering; of course you have to know what it's doing and when to trust it and when to ignore it, which is kind of a general truth about automated tools anyway.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
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    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  10. #20

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    I arrived at RF35's from speed graphics, so, it was easy to adopt. With hi-speed film (asa200) I set my focus at 25 feet, f8 and set the shutter according to the light. Usually off the reccomendations on the paperwork accompaming the film. Then I just followed the target until it was within range on the rangefinder, went to the viewfinder window to compose the shot, and took it. Color slide film really needed accurate metering. B/W didn't/doesn't.

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