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Thread: Airse 35 III C

  1. #1
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Airse 35 III C

    I just inherited an Aires 35 III C. (ƒ1.9/45mm)

    http://www.camerapedia.org/wiki/Aires_35

    From my research, I gather it's basically a 1950's vintage Japanese knockoff of a Leica. Right?

    It's seems to be in good working condition and it looks like a really nice camera. It's in the original box with the manual and everything.

    So, I put a roll of film in it (Legacy/Neopan 400) and I'm giving it a test flight. I'm figuring it all out, pretty well but I'm still shaky on a couple of things. I can load it, focus it and operate everything but I'm having trouble understanding how the exposure is set.

    I see the shutter speed and aperture rings. I see the exposure (light value) numbers and I understand how the two rings couple to set reciprocal shutter speeds.

    I've got a Gossen Luna Pro meter. I understand how to read the exposure number off the meter and set the aperture/shutter to match.

    But I don't understand how to account for film of different speeds? Does the camera "know" this, somehow? Or do you have to manually compensate using the light meter in some way?

    I suppose I could just use the Gossen light meter and calculate the shutter/aperture combination then keep them in sync as I use it to make different shots in the same light.

    Have y'all got any pointers for me? Are there any pitfalls or idiosyncrasies I need to watch out for. (Okay... I already forgot to take off the lens cap once! ) Are there any special modes of failure that I need to watch out for?

    I have already read that one needs to operate the controls carefully so as not to jam them because, if you do, it's easy to jam things up and break things.

    Thanks in advance!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    IGNORE THE FOLLOWING - I was looking at the wrong manual.

    Referring to the manual on Mike Butkus' site, it looks to me like the exposure meter in the camera is one that isn't coupled to the aperture and shutter settings on the camera. So you set the ISO (or ASA, as it then was ) on the meter, take a reading, and then transfer the results to the camera.

    So in essence, it is the same as if you used the Gossen meter.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by MattKing; 12-04-2010 at 01:08 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Post is wrong
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I have looked at the manual and it would appear that this camera does not have a built in light meter. In that case what they are caling Light Value numbers (LV) aree really Exposure Value numbers (EV). An EV number is a combination of shutter speed and aperture with no regard for film speed or actual light level. An LV number is just that, a measurement of light level.

    When using ISO 100 film the EV number needed for correct exposure is the same number as the LV number. For other ISO rated films, the numbers will not correspond. e.g. am ISO 400 film wil require two stops less light than ISO 100 so the EV number used will be two higher than LV number measured.

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Referring to the manual on Mike Butkus' site, it looks to me like the exposure meter in the camera is one that isn't coupled to the aperture and shutter settings on the camera.
    It's possible that I looked at the manual for the wrong model then as I couldn't find a reference to a meter.

    http://www.collection-appareils.fr/a...e=35%20III%20C


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Oops - Steve, you are right.

    Looks like I was looking at the manual for another model - the Aires 35 V.

    I've edited the post to indicate that.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    No, I don't think the camera has any meter... unless I've totally missed something.

    The only reference to film speed on the entire camera is a little "remider" dial on the back of the leather case. It's almost the same thing as the one on my Yashica Mat. It's not connected to anything. It's just there to remind you.

    So, basically, you read the EV from the hand held meter and set the "LVS" number on the camera to match but, if the film is not ISO-100 you have to use a little "Kentucky Windage" to compensate. Right?

    That's kind of what I was thinking.
    Randy S.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #6
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    The meter is more likely to give you LV numbers which as I mentioned earlier, are only the same as EV at ISO 100.

    In my opinion it would make more sense to use the meter to find a suitable combination of shutter speed and aperture rather than use the number system.

    The numbers do work well on some cameras with built in meters though. I recently bought a Yashica Minister rangefinder. The meter on this points to a light value number which you then transfer to the camera in a similar way to the Aires. These are true LV numbers though as when you set the ISO it moves the dial which the meter needle points at.

    As an all in one package it works very well but if you need to use a separate meter I think that shutter speed and aperture is an easier system to use.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I farted around with this camera some more, today. Here is what I did.

    I took the light reading with my meter and got an aperture/shutter combination and set the camera accordingly but I would still note the EV number as I worked. It's easy because you still have to set EV on the calculator dial. That acts as your reminder. Then, at that point you can take additional EV readings and quickly adjust up or down. When you go to a new setting that has different light you just "reboot" your light reading again, starting from scratch.

    If you have a little time to sample the highlights, shadows and midtones you can get a range of EV numbers in your head and just use Kentucky windage to set exposures on the fly.

    That's kind of how I have learned to work when I use my Yashica Mat except that the difference is that the Aires has discreet stops where the Yashica doesn't. Either way, you home in on a range of exposures and use your wit and experience to guide you on a particular shot in that setting.

    Using cameras without integral meters or any kind of automatic exposure system (or automatic ANYTHING) is really teaching me a lot about photography. In fact, once I get into the swing of things, I even start to like it better.

    The bottom line is that there is a lot to be said for manual exposure and what you learn when you can't "crutch" on automatic systems.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/



 

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