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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    You can leave the R72 on the lens and simply dial in compensation. When you're past +2 simply change the ISO dial to add the extra compensation necessary.
    Yeah, that's what I do now and was trying to avoid.

    FYI: I currently shoot between ISO 6 and 25, so that doesn't leave a lot of flexibility.

  2. #12
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Well not much other option other than handheld metering and applying the filter factor. I'd stick with rangefinders though for IR work. They're great cause you can leave the filter on the lens and not worry about looking through it when composing.

  3. #13

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    yes, when I put a filter on first time, I forgot to adjust exposure combination and got under exposure film.

  4. #14
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    Nope, nor the Fuji equivalent. The metering cell is located next to the RF. I was really hoping it was as that would have been perfect.
    Indeed, no TTL but very acurate.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    But the SLR MF cameras use TTL focusing and metering so why not rangefinders? The RB67 (and I think RZ67) keeps the leaf shutter open while you're composing the picture and with the AE finder it uses the light through the lens to meter. When you press the shutter button it closes the shutter, lifts the light baffle and mirror, opens the shutter for duration of exposure, closes shutter. This is slower and more complicated than cameras which simply leave the shutter closed until you need it but it is possible for SLRs so it should be possible for RF as well.
    No problem if they have a focal plane shutter. With a leaf shutter some sort of light baffle would be needed, like leaf shutter SLR's have behind the mirror. Could be done, no doubt.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #16

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    Right -- designing TTL metering for a camera with a leaf shutter adds unnecessary complexity and cost.

    With an SLR -- even one with a leaf shutter -- you can add TTL metering, because the mirror often is part of a light-blocking baffle. When the shutter release is pressed, the shutter closes, the mirror raises, the lens stops down and the shutter is released -- all within a short period.

    With a leaf shutter-equipped rangefinder, there is no baffle in front of the film, so you would have to add a blind. Then when you advance the film, it tensions and opens the shutter and brings the blind into place. The aperture can simply close down as needed. When you press the release, the shutter must close, the blind must move swiftly out of the way and the shutter can then release.

    However, with medium format, you're talking about a big blind to cover up to 6x9. That makes the camera thicker and heavier and the moving that blind adds to vibration and noise. And of course you run the risk of burning holes in the blind when the film has been wound -- unless the blind is made of metal.

    But if you're going to put in a metal blind, you might as well use a metal SLR-style shutter, although I can't recall them being made in this size.

    In addition, it adds mechanical complexity (ask anyone who's worked on an SLR with a balky leaf shutter), which inevitably adds to production costs as well as more costly repairs.

    At a certain point, why bother? Medium format film has enough latitude to handle small errors in exposure.

    While it would be nice, there's nothing wrong with most onboard meters or even a handheld meter.

  7. #17

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    Thanks Mike. You're right, of course. The Mamiya 7 has a "blind" built in for when you change lenses, but having that become moveable in an instant with exposure is another level of complexity.

  8. #18

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    Wouldn't it be really nice if the metering cell on a rangefinder was placed in such a way that you could hold your filter over it, or even nicer a built in compensator so that you could just stop down the meter.

    Then again you could just get a piece of gel that reduces the light the same as your filter, cut it to fit the meter cell and then tape it in place that might not look pretty, but it should work, and unlike an adjustable meter, lets face it you are not going to forget to remove something that ugly when you remove the filter.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  9. #19
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Again, they are not MF, but most of those old cameras will meter "through the filter" as desired, if not "through the lens".

    http://www.cameraquest.com/com35s.htm

    You will notice that normally the lightmeter is placed so that it meters the light passing through a filter threaded over the lens.

    One might wonder, though, about the reliability of CdS sensors if used with an IR filter. CdS have an unequal response through the light spectrum. Some experiments should be carried on to determine if an exposure compensation is needed.

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #20

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    Have you looked at the new CV Bessa III specs? This just might fit the bill,

    Bob
    Best regards,

    Bob
    CEO-CFO-EIEIO, Ret.

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