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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by olwick View Post
    Thanks. It's not about accuracy. I've used the Mamiya 7 and it's a beautiful camera.

    I do a lot of B&W infrared film work. What I'm looking for is something where I can leave my very dark R72 filter on the camera, have the camera meter through it, and still compose through the rangefinder.

    I'm just lazy and don't want to do the exposure compensation with a non-TTL meter or hand-held meter.
    Well, even if you had TTL metering, you would need to also figure out if the meter had the same sensitivity at NIR. Why don't you just determine the film speed when filtered and then set your camera to that.

  2. #22

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    With infrared, there can be so many variables that it's tough to say what's the correct exposure in just about any situation. I've been using a handheld meter using a range of ASA 6 to 25.

    I agree that a TTL meter is of limited use with infrared film.

  3. #23
    stevebrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpsawin View Post
    Have you looked at the new CV Bessa III specs? This just might fit the bill,

    Bob
    The Bessa III does not have TTL. The sensor window is adjacent to the rangefinder window on the front of the camera.


    Steve

  4. #24
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My Canonet meter reads through a mounted filter.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #25
    RobertV's Avatar
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    The Bessa III does not have TTL. The sensor window is adjacent to the rangefinder window on the front of the camera.

    All details:

    http://www.voigtlaender.de/cms/voigtlaender/voigtlaender_cms.nsf/gfx/4FE9F68EAF6D6261C125775200320725/$file/Bedienungsanleitung_bessaIII.pdf

  6. #26
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    You are going to be on a tripod anyhow with today's IR films. An in-camera meter will not save you any time in that case anyhow, so it's only advantage goes away. Why rely on an inherently flawed device such as an in-camera meter when you can just get a relatively cheap hand held incident meter and get trouble-free exposures every time? What good is a little bit of convenience if you get a less-than-ideal exposure most of the time, due to the fact that most pictures do not average out to exactly middle grey?

    Just to show yourself how wrong in-camera meters are most of the time, you should go out shooting one day with an incident meter. For each shot, take a frame exposed as your camera sez, and a frame exposed as the incident meter sez. When shooting, note just how rarely the two match. On these rare occasions, your composition truly averages out to middle grey within the metering pattern of the camera. When printing, note how much better the incident-exposed film prints. Especially with IR film, you are better off making an educated guess than using a TTL light meter. Just my two cents. Take it or leave it. My point is simply not to let something as trivial as an in-camera light meter make or break your decision on what camera to purchase. It's like deciding what luxury car to buy based on what type of system the manufacturer uses to gauge the fuel level.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 01-16-2011 at 03:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #27

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    I have the solution: somewhere on the net is a do it yourself project which has a prototype
    Somewhere on the net: a leicaphile with an old battered IIIc put a backward facing silicon photo
    Diode and a simple (to him)circuit which caused an LED to glow when the correct exposure was
    Found using the aperture range: he painted a white dot in the middle of the first curtain to meter off.

    You could adapt a baby speed graphic to do this...
    Thinking a little more laterally, if you defeated the interlocking mechanism and painted the darkslides black,
    With a large white dot in the middle you could do it with a Mamiya Universal or a Graflex XL.

    And you would have a lunar effect on your film protector.....
    ...The Darkslide of the Moon.....

    Now you know the power of the Darkslide....

    David

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