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  1. #1

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    Finally got a rangefinder, but need some help!

    Hello APUG community, I need to pick your collective brain. After a few months of interest in old Japanese compact rangefinders I managed to pick one up last weekend at a swap meet. I got a good deal on an Olympus 35 SP in beautiful condition, but it came with a catch. The catch was that the battery door is "jammed" shut, so thus no metering (spot metering even!) or auto mode. I figured that I have a handheld meter and I wouldn't miss those features since the camera is in great mechanical shape and since the electronics run off of a PX625 which is a pain to deal with. However, I would still very much like to fix this problem, but I don't know what to do now. I've tried to remove the bottom plate since unjamming the battery door would be an easy task after that, but the screws that hold the bottom plate in are also stuck and won't budge (my screwdriver shaft started rotating in the handle instead ). I don't know where to go from here and was hoping that somebody here might give me some ideas. Thanks!

    I ran a roll of Superia through it a few days ago to test the camera and everything went smoothly (that lens too, wow!). Here's one of the test shots.


  2. #2

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    I had some luck with a similar problem using a q-tip with some penetrating oil on it and carefully dabbing the screws with it. After a couple days, the screws came loose easily.

    Mike

  3. #3

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    First, be patient. Anything you do that involves excessive force has a good chance of biting you. Second, assume any camera you work on first has the possibility of getting damaged. Consider taking it to a repair shop - they may be able to deal with it quickly and easily. Screws can strip with surprisingly little force, particularly if your screwdriver isn't a perfect fit.

    I'd suggest putting a drop of Liquid Wrench, Bolt Off, something along those lines on the screws and letting it sit for a little while. I've had some screwed take several passes with chemicals like this before they loosened up. One some really sticky ones, I've tried using heat but haven't had much success with it.

  4. #4

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    Little trick for using heat on tiny and delicate screws: use the tip of a soldering iron directly applied to the head of the screw. This localizes the heat and prevents damage to surrounding components and finishes. Several heat cycles will usually break almost anything loose, at least if it isn't completely rusted.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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  5. #5
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    The first thing I'd try is to make up a baking soda solution/slurry and apply it around the area and let it sit for a few hours. IIf it can get into the threads, it will sometimes work. You can try the WD40/liquid wrench after that. If you do the oil first, it is hard for the baking soda solution to get in.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for all the tips, guys! I'm going to try some of these out sometime soon and I will report back.
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Legge View Post
    First, be patient. Anything you do that involves excessive force has a good chance of biting you. Second, assume any camera you work on first has the possibility of getting damaged. Consider taking it to a repair shop - they may be able to deal with it quickly and easily. Screws can strip with surprisingly little force, particularly if your screwdriver isn't a perfect fit.
    No worries there, I'm extremely careful when handling anything delicate like a camera or electronics. My screwdriver was a perfect fit and it just didn't turn the screws. I was careful not to strip anything. If nothing works, I might take it to a tech, but it's not even a big deal really since the camera works perfectly fine without the battery. We'll see!

  7. #7

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    I've found the penetrating oil much better than the baking soda solution. As above, a small drop & letting it work overnight works well.
    I've used it in instant grat. mode with no happiness, without adding more oil, just letting the screws soak overnight. Barely any force used to remove 'em.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #8
    Steve Mack's Avatar
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    Nix on the WD-40. The letters "WD" stand for "water-dispersing". After the rest of the liquid dries, you're left with a residue (the "water-dispersing" part), which may or may not gum up the works.

    Just a thought.

    With best regards,

    Stephen



 

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