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  1. #21
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Opening the bellows before you turn the knob is such a trivial thing to do. Even if there is little difference or even no difference at all, the solution is so simple and virtually without cost that there is no reason not to do it.

    I will try to remember to operate the camera in that order but, if I forget... what the hell?
    As time goes on and I get more and more pictures out of the camera, I'll see whether it makes a difference.

    It's good to have knowledge and understand the possible ramifications of doing things a certain way versus another but you have to keep things in perspective. Right?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #22
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    More Photos

    Scanned a couple more pictures:

    In my Flickr set:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randyst...7627540697735/


    I don't think there's really a problem with it, per se. It could probably use a CLA and the rangefinder likely needs calibrated but, to be honest, I don't think there's anything majorly wrong.

    I think it's just the way this camera works. It's a rangefinder camera. It just "sees" the world in a different way than I understand it to. I've shot, literally, 90% of my life with SLR cameras. I just need to learn how to see the way the camera sees.

    With that in mind, I do think I tried to push the camera out of its intended purpose. I'm thinking the same as others have mentioned. The Ikonta was made for the traveller or the tourist. Although the camera won't take great pictures in every situation, if you learn how to use it, you can take pictures in many situations.

    Would I use a pitching wedge to drive off the tee? Would I try to race a minivan in the Indy 500? Well, okay, those are silly examples but they illustrate my point.

    I need to learn how to work with the camera and not push it to do things it wasn't made to do.

    You can't use a Japanese calligraphy brush to paint a house.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    If I was D.B Cooper, I'd call you just to get a look at your camera. That pic is great.

    This may sound stupid, but my Zeiss Ikonta B (zone focuser, earlier model than yours) measures in meters, not feet. Did they change for later models?
    I don't think it is due to the age of the model - I think they stuck on a focussing ring to suit the country in which the cameras were sold.

    Most of my folding cameras are 'UK' models, so they are always in feet. A few I've bought on eBay from elsewhere in Europe are in metres. I have two Agfa Isolettes, about the same vintage. Virtually identical, except the German model is in metres and the UK version is in feet.
    Steve

  4. #24
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    If I was D.B Cooper, I'd call you just to get a look at your camera. That pic is great.
    BTW: Thanks!... If I didn't say so, sorry. I often get tunnel vision when I'm concentrating on something.

    Presque Isle is a great place for picture taking. It would be a good place to have a photography meet. I'll be sure to bring the Ikonta!

    I've got several other cameras that I still need to get out and blow the dust off.
    There'll probably be more posts like this coming along soon.

    Thanks for everybody's help, so far! It makes a big difference!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #25
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Doesn't the Ikonta have a double-exposure prevention? My 6x9 does, it helps make it practical to wind just before shooting.

  6. #26
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Yes, it does. But, every once in a while, it jams up, somehow, causing me to either have to double expose a frame or skip one all together.

    Winding before shooting and making sure that the knob goes all the way to the stop seems to prevent that from happening as often.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by steven_e007 View Post
    I don't think it is due to the age of the model - I think they stuck on a focussing ring to suit the country in which the cameras were sold.

    Most of my folding cameras are 'UK' models, so they are always in feet. A few I've bought on eBay from elsewhere in Europe are in metres. I have two Agfa Isolettes, about the same vintage. Virtually identical, except the German model is in metres and the UK version is in feet.
    It's interesting to learn this. So mine must be a Euro model. I have loved this camera since I first opened the box. It just so sophisticated and primitive, klunky and smooth, all at the same time. My first non-35mm, it opened up a whole new avenue of folding GAS desires.

  8. #28

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    Return on that old thread :

    I extracted from the high resolution scan that was provided two details :

    One letter of the message that the camera was focused on (at 10-15 feet, for me - continental european - easier : 3-4m)

    The sea horizon line (at random near the middle) of the picture (at infinity, indeed)

    The discussion was about : while the picture was taken at D = 22 (with a 75mm lens), shouldn't the horizon line be sharper ?

    The well known hyperfocal formula for a confusion circle c is :

    h = f²/Dc

    So, when focusing at distance h, the blurring of details at infinity should be :

    c = f²/Dh

    and taking f=75mm , D=22 and h = 3.5m you get a confusion circle of (approximately) 0.1mm

    I put a white blob of this diameter in the middle of the horizon line, and you can notice that the blurring is of similar magnitude.

    So to my opinion, the camera has absolutely no focusing problem, it's only an issue of DOF.

    Paul
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Confusion.jpg  

  9. #29
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    I read that ... if you close or open the bellows too fast, you create a vacuum that pulls the film out of the focal plane.
    Old wives' tale I'm afraid. Unless you have a large hole in the pressure plate venting to the outside atmosphere so that air can get in to push on the film ... a feature of old Hasselblad backs, but Hassy's don't have bellows.

    There isn't any air between the film and the pressure plate to expand outwards - heck, if there were the film would have to be bowed out all ready. And as the bellows is opened all the air in the camera all looses pressure at the same time: so the air pressure around the pressure plate (and in back of the plate if it has a hole for a red-window) is the same as the air pressure in front of the film so even if air were claimed to rush in behind the film at the last minute it won't.

    The film in some cameras is backwound around the rollers - again Hasselblad comes to mind - and the film can have a bowed out crease if it is wound on just before a shot. The second shot can have a crease if the camera had been left alone for a while even if the film was kept wound on. Most (all?) folders have a straight film path so this isn't a problem.

    My practice from 50 years of shooting with folders and other cameras without double-exposure-prevention is to wind the film right after talking a shot, then the camera is always ready to take a picture and there is never any question of 'did I wind the film????'. I may open and close the bellows several times in anticipation without taking a picture. A double exposure is a very sure way to ruin a photo.

    You can check infinity focus by aiming at an infinity target, setting the lens at infinity and checking focus at the film plane. A bit of Scotch frosted sticky tape stretched across the rollers makes a good temporary 'ground glass'. The lens should be at infinity, the image in focus and the rangefinder in co-incidence if all is copacetic.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 12-17-2011 at 12:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  10. #30

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    I don't believe either to the risc of "pulling the film out of the focal plane" when opening a folder. But I DO spool the film AFTER opening the folder and JUST BEFORE shooting, for another reason, that I justified experimentally :

    When I did not proceed this way (doing like you the spooling just after shooting), I often found white spots on my negs (yielding black spots on the positive enlargments), and I desespered to determine what caused that, until I noticed that when I took two views without closing the camera in between, the second was free of these spots : thus I deduced that inside the chamber, dust is likely to be moved on the film either when the folder is closed or when it is opened (or at anytime between shooting). And when this happens before shooting, this dust would be "silouhetted" on the picture. But when you spool new film JUST before shooting, it should not happen.

    Thus, I tried this new sequence of operation systematically, and it worked. Besides, when you use folders that don't have safeguards against multiple exposure, it's a good thing to adopt a systematic sequence of operation, to be sure that you spooled the film between shoots ; and if the sequence tells you to spool the film "just before" shooting, it's easier to remember ?

    Maybe you never experienced such spots because your folders are very clean (dust free) inside, but I can tell this sequence of operation cured a lot of problems I had with mine.

    Bye Paul

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