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Tilting the Pacemaker cameras

  1. Bertil
    Graflex Pacemaker cameras: the Speed and Crown Graphics, lacked the simple possibility of forward tilting the front standard. Eventually introduced on the Super Graphics by a very simple construction, more simple than good, but possible. Would have thought forward tilting a more needed movement than the opposite. Tilting forward is always possible by dropping the bed, but not as easy as tilting backward which was always possible. Anybody who knows way Graflex for the Pacemaker, during all these years in production, preferred backward rather than forward tilting? Its use as a press camera?
  2. df cardwell
    df cardwell
    To get rise and fall, which IS more important than tilt,
    you drop the bed, which tilts the lens forward.
    You then tilt the lens back to straighten the lens.

    There is an obsession with view camera movements,
    which are not necessary in a hand camera.

    That said, it takes 5 minutes to turn the front standard 180˚,
    to get forward tilt. This is what it looks like when you are there:

    If you have any questions, please PM me.



    1. Carefully remove the nuts from each side of the front standard.
    You will have to apply some force at the end of the screw.

    Gently pull the standard arms apart, and remove the lens assembly.

    2. Unlock the front standard. Press the locking tab.

    3. Rotate it 180˚.

    Replace the lens, and the nuts. You now have front tilt !
  3. Bertil
    Bertil
    Had no idea that it was that simple. It took me less than 5 minutes to make the change! (Saw once a picture of a Crown, obviously with this change, could not really understand if I saw things right!) Did not have the guts to unscrew enough of my front standard before, your picture helped very much. Realized soon that the ordinary way permits more flexibility with various movements when dropping the bed, so I changed back. But very nice to know how to make the change. I think you answered my question! Thanks!
  4. Rob Archer
    Rob Archer
    Did this with my Century Graphic, but I changed back when I realised I would not be able to use the dropped bed for a wider lens without tilt. Useful to be able to, though.

    Thanks

    Rob
  5. Ian Grant
    Ian Grant
    One problem with reversing the front standard is the camera won't close, at least with the side rangefinder. The lock nut for front-tilt fouls the runner/wheel for the rangefinder cam at the rear of the focus track. If you remove the runner/wheel then the camera closes.

    The major problem with the Crown & Speed Graphics is no tilt at all in Portrait mode, there is an article on how to achieve this around somewhere. View Camera offer a PDF article on how to convert a Graphic, I think it's abot $25 but I've not read it.

    Ian
  6. Bertil
    Bertil
    A guy some time ago on eBay uk sold a Crown to which he had added twist movement. The picture on this Crown looked very nice with the lens twisted to the left and the right. He also said (I kept his text!): "I can modify your front standard to include the twist movement, if you are interested contact me at filmsize5x4@yahoo.co.uk". With such a change on a Speed or a Crown you will get both kinds of tilt in Portrait mode (I suppose).
    //Bertil
  7. nworth
    nworth
    The lens movements on the Graphic are limited but are usually adequate. Most of the time you don't need them, but there are those times when you do. The drop bed provides adequate front tilt, but you can not get both rising front and downward tilt at the same time. I haven't found that to be a problem. Some people don't realize that you can get front shift as well with this camera.
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