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New owner!

  1. AmericanMrs
    Hi
    I have just bought an RB 67 Pro S. I've never used MF before so I'm guessing it's going to be a steep learning curve!
    I've got my film ordered and can't wait to get out and use it.

    My main areas of interests are portraits and still life.
    I'm pretty competent with 35mm and digital cameras although I'm guessing even loading a film is going to be a challenge

    Wish me luck - oh and any advice for a first time user would be appreciated!
  2. djhopscotch
    djhopscotch
    Make sure when you go to use it that the release switch on the lens isn't set to mirror-up, the body will still flag that the frame has been exposed when you trip the body release, but no exposure will have been made. Only thing i don't like about the camera.
  3. mopar_guy
    mopar_guy
    Loading rollfilm is easy. If you have specific questions, ask. Congrats and enjoy.

    Dave
  4. paul ron
    paul ron
    Read the manual... get it here....

    http://www.butkus.org/chinon/mamiya.htm
  5. smcclarin
    smcclarin
    Chant these words every time you use it with an older film back: (DARK SLIDE..DARK SLIDE...DARKSLIDE...DONT FORGET THE DARKSLIDE) Hopefully you get to enjoy slowing down while thinking and seeing as much as the rest of us.
  6. Ric Trexell
    Ric Trexell
    The thing to remember about loading roll films is that you do not take the sticker off the roll, or put it on at the end of the roll by taking it out of the camera. That way you can't accidently drop the roll and expose it as it unrolls as it crashes to the floor.

    I didn't say that very clearly so let me try again. Put roll in camera. Remove sticker. Wind film into take up roller. Expose roll and put sticker on the roll. Remove roll from camera. There that makes more sence. Ric.
  7. dodphotography
    dodphotography
    new user here as well... loving this damn camera. I have been shooting all Velvia slides and they have an awesome easy seal sticker at the end, so no issues there.
  8. baxjj
    baxjj
    Hi there! I'd shot film before 12-15 years ago and made the switch back with my "new to me" RB67 ProS a couple of months ago. Initially it seems a bit of a daunting learning curve. But its an absolute pleasure to work with once you suss everything out.

    I found this YouTube video very helpful when i was trying to suss out how to work it:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhL2CA-zauU

    One helpful hint... and if anyone has better ideas, I would love to hear them... instead of the ex$pen$ive dual cable release, I bought two single cable releases and fire them separately, when shooting at slow speeds.

    I so enjoy this camera. Yeah its way manual. But it sure is a joy.

  9. photo_griz
    photo_griz
    I'm not sure why you need the second cable release at all for the RB67. I recently got a ProSD, so maybe this doesn't apply to all models, but when in mirror-uo mode I just flip the mirror with the button on the body using my fingers. Since no exposure is made at this time, I don't have to worry about camera shake. I wait a second or two, then use the cable release to fire the shutter on the lens.

    If I'm not using the mirror up mode, I switch the cable release to the body.
  10. Ric Trexell
    Ric Trexell
    Photo-griz: I don't think it works that way on the Pro-S if I understand you right. To use the T-mode, you set it to T on the lense, trip the shutter with the button on the bottom of the camera (this really only raises the mirror), then use a cable release to actually trip the shutter. You must then return the T-lever to the non-T mode. Ric.
  11. nworth
    nworth
    The main difficulty will be the fact that this is a manual camera. There is no automatic exposure, motor wind, auto-focus or other goody to make exposures foolproof. The fact that it uses interchangeable lenses with between the lens shutters is another peculiarity that takes some getting used to. Get a good light meter, and read the manual. You will have more errors than with your 35, but you will also got better quality and will have a great time using this camera.
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