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Back to my roots.

  1. Gerry M
    Hi to all,
    I have recently returned to using tlr's, after many, many years of being away from them. My first "real" camera was a mid 1950's Yashica tlr (new at the time). Now, after a whole bunch of decades, I am using, and really enjoying, a Rolleicord V and a Rolleiflex 2.8e. I have also started, again, developing my own b&w, but have no darkroom, so..... I must use a scanner..... I'm probably not supposed to admit that publicly, but...??? I hope I am not banned for that transgression.
    Gerry
  2. Toffle
    Toffle
    Welcome here. Look around the place... shake the bushes... see what you can stir up.

    There is probably a bunch of darkroom stuff around your area that is practially free for the taking. It's fun developing your own film, but it's magic watching your prints appear in the developing tray.

    Cheers,
    Tom
  3. Irrev.Rev.
    Irrev.Rev.
    Hey!
    My TLR story echos Gerry's almost exactly; first TLR was a borrowed Yashica.
    Received a pre-war Rolleicord a few years back but simply added it to the small group of vintage 35MM's that I've been using. On a whim, I bid for a Yash/124 and have this real spotless gem that's been demanding so much of my attention.
    Feast or famine? Just received a Rollei T from my long-retired Photographer father-in-law; never new he had this or the other that's waiting in Florida. (CLR guy suspects some lens staining!) I was hoping for the Nikon F in the will!!
    Anyway, as I mentioned above, there's something seductive about these TLRs, as the dwindling supply of 120 film in the fridge will attest. Been shooting a lot of snowscapes past few months and plan a series of 'front door' shots around this old seaport city. If the "T" comes up clean and fit, it will be dueling TLRs.

    John
  4. desertratt
    desertratt
    In the late 1950s I won a raffle and got a Rolleiflex 3.5 for a buck. It kick started my career as a photographer. I "advanced" to 35mm Nikon and Leica, also used a Yashicamat, and have a digital SLR Nikon. What I am mostly doing, being sort of retired, is scanning my old b&w negatives, many of them 120, to make prints for sales in galleries. I really don't have the ability to put a wet darkroom in my home and there are no rental darkrooms within 100 miles. NO way I'm going to send my negatives out. So the prints will be digital, although I prefer dip and dunk. My Rollie negs make such great large prints and their dynamic range is fabulous.
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