I talked with a guy I work with this morning, and his advice was to load it up with hot water & let it soak for a day or two and then flush it out with more water & to just keep at it. The rebuilt one we ended up getting came with new tanks though--the tanks are sold as sets actually, so you can't really get them out individually. I think the best way to clean them is by some sort of passive way--I'd be a little leery of putting bleaches and such into the tanks....the guy that services ours has told us some funny stories though--about people dropping process thermometers into the tanks by accident and cracking the elements or having the cabinets so old & degraded, that the machine would fall over if you rolled it away from a wall....

the tanks are usually factory set for a process temperature, and sometimes they set them slightly higher to accomodate for the drift that happens in heat loss for the trough lid etc. The same for the water panels. For E6 we run at 102 on a Hass Intellifaucet, but the tanks are down at 100-101 or so. There are two lights on the left side, under the pressure gauges. These are the tank-deck heater lights. They normally sorta blink on & off sequentially--this tells you the temp is okay in the tanks. If one light stays solid or never comes on, there's a problem, or the chem is heating up. One thing that has happened to us in the winter, for example, is the ambient room temp gets low enough to where it takes a day or longer to stabilize the chemistry after you mix it up. 65 or so is about the coldest that room gets.

fwiw, they make an accessory for it where you can bypass the drains for the fixers & bleaches, so you can reuse these or run them through recovery units. We mostly do it for the recovery unit. You can also get a lid for it that will let you handpour your developer-- might work for your b&w...the best advice I guess I can give would be to cover up the red lights on the processor with black tape when you load the film...

good luck--KT