WORKSHOP: The Colorful Print: Photography Before 1843
Saturday, November 6, 9 am -5 pm
Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin


Before shades of brown became the standard for nineteenth-century photographs, the earliest experimental printing processes were colorful and often painterly. In this class, participants will gain an understanding of the photographic printing processes invented by Hercules Florence, W. H. Fox Talbot, Sir John Herschel, and Robert Hunt.

Participants may bring or select from objects provided to make photogenic drawings, cyanotypes, and chromatypes using formulas from several early inventors to achieve a variety of surprising hues. Not intended for display, most of these prints are fugitive and share a uniquely mysterious and delicate quality. They can be scanned to record the quality of the print before it evolves over time.

A rare look at vintage examples in the Harry Ransom Center's collection will be a highlight of the day. This class offers a unique insight for artists, educators, and historians interested in exploring a well-researched early photographic experience. No prerequisites.

Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman are fine art photographers and scholars specializing in early photographic processes, most notably, wet-plate collodion. Mark has researched, practiced, and taught historic processes for over 20 years and is the Photographic Process Historian at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, Rochester, NY. France is an artist, writer, and educator at Scully & Osterman Studio and guest scholar at Eastman House.

Registration is limited and will close one week prior to the event, or when available slots are filled. Cost: $225 (includes $25 lab fee)
. To register: http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/events/