</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (tschmid @ May 14 2003, 04:06 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>it seems to be a better approach to replenish timely than to adjust filtration.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>My sentiment as well.. why also so-called constant developers and/or replenstishment of some sort too is appropriate to B&W chemistry.


</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (tschmid @ May 14 2003, 04:06 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>In my understanding, a control strip is a well-known pre-exposed piece of paper that is analyzed with a densitometer. A test strip is more or less an indicator if something is ok or not. I sometimes use test strips to check if&nbsp; my BX is still ok (which is not that easy to determine as CD)</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>This is where the Lici/Jobo ColorStar (and its Jobo&#39;s patent montebank mutation as Colorline] comes in very nicely. By examining the calibration prints made on the same batch (no need really for frozen specimens since the printing paper is not the same and one is looking to get good prints with a "wellknown" batch of papers and chemistry and not standardized process control) against a colour reference card--- a reflective colour densitometer is nice but not really demanded by this regime--- one can see monitor, control and adjust the chemistry accordingly.