Quote Originally Posted by moki View Post
Thinking about how solargraphy makes a digital scanner necessary, I thought of another, completely analog way... What about taking a photo of the exposed sheets with positive film (medium or large format for best resolution) and enlarge that onto paper for a true positive silver print of the solargraphic negative? The paper negative can be exposed to a little light before going completely dark (it already does so in the scanner), so that shouldn't be a problem when you're fast enough. A diffused flash might be useful to minimize unnecessary exposure... Of course, I wouldn't try that with such a big project and the danger of destroying it, but I think it's possible if you're careful. I'll try it next week with a small camera that has been sitting on the windowsill for 10 days.
Sounds like a great idea man, I'd love to see how it turns out!

Quote Originally Posted by moki View Post
As for the colors: Those are usually completely random and rarely as realistic as in this picture. I don't know where exactly they come from, but I think it's just the color correction in the scanner doing something funky. Definitely not the black and white paper magically turning into a color negative by overexposure (unless I misunderstood the whole chemistry of silverbased paper). I usually got reddish purple skies with bluish sun and corrected them afterwards, since it was digital anyway.
Hmm I'm not sure. I didn't scan my negatives, they were much too large. I photographed the 6 large tiles with my 5D Mark II and pieced them together in Photoshop. The original negatives definitely had some color, very very low contrast, but I could definitely discern some variances in color. And I didn't apply any color correction either. I also took a digital photograph of the building (my high school) to compare and the colors don't seem to be random. Hmm..