Quote Originally Posted by rrobinson54
1. Film scanner vs. Flatbed scanner - I cannot spend more than an additional $1,000 on a good scanner and am leaning toward the dedicated film scanner (if I can find one for around $1,000). My question is: do the latest flatbed scanners by Epson & Canon come close to the performance of a mid-level medium format film scanner? The technology on the Minolta Multi Scan Pro is getting a bit old (2002). Is it still good enough for high quality film scanning?
I was not impressed with the Epson flatbeds 2450 and 4870 for medium format, or even 4x5 once I saw the quality difference with a drum scanner. My opinion is most inexpensive CCD scanners do not look right to me.

Quote Originally Posted by rrobinson54
2. I have an HP7960 printer (8-1/2"X11"), which I plan to keep as a b&w printer. I plan to buy a good used Epson 2200. Is the Epson still considered one of the best printers (quality, life of print, color, etc.)? If not, what would be a better choice?
The Epson 2200 is a great printer on matte paper, but it is not at all good on glossy. If you like glossy look at the new Epson R1800. Neither of these printers will produce as high of dmax as you can get on silver paper (color or B&W). They just look different. In my opinion again the 2200 combined with the QuadTone RIP makes stunning black and white on velvet paper. it doesn't look like a silver print at all but it is very nice. Look at some samples and see if you like the look. Also put them behind glass if you normally frame images this way - it really helps the look. If you don't like the inkjet output you can use many local labs to print you digital files on type C paper for not much money. After the cost of paper and ink this may be the cheapest way.

Quote Originally Posted by rrobinson54
3. I know that I will need to upgrade my current computer to handle the file sizes of medium format. I am still using an iMac G3 and am thinking of buying a used Apple G4, with enough memory to handle medium format files. Would I be smarter to buy a new iMac G5 or something else?
You will need over 1GB on a PC for Photoshop if you scan 6x7 at 4000dpi. I assume a Mac will be the same. More memory always helps with digital imaging.

Quote Originally Posted by rrobinson54
4. Film - I normally use Fuji Astia, but will probably start using Velvia. Good or bad choice? I would prefer to stay with slide film and I am looking for the best quality film for landscapes and scanning purposes.
I like Astia and Velvia. I really like Velvia for some images, but my wife always picks the Provia or Astia shot. So this is a matter of taste, so only you can decide.

Quote Originally Posted by rrobinson54
Any information or opinions would be much appreciated.
I think I produce better color work in the darkroom than on the computer. It is easier to fix difficult images on the computer. It is far easier to make a C print from a well exposed negative than to scan, correct and then print on the computer. And cheaper if you get a drum scan made. So far digital has proven easier than Ilfochrome for me.

You don't even need a lot of space for a darkroom. A medium format enlarger can be small and palced in a closet or bathroom. A Jobo on the bathroom or kitchen counter is all you need to process both film and either Ilfochrome or C prints.