When I got home yesterday I looked through my archive of photo-processing literature. I was surprised to find that I still had a copy of the instruction sheet for a Beseler CN-2 Liquid Color Negative Processing Kit.

The back of the 8-page 21.6cm x 27.7cm booklet is marked, “Printed in West Germany.” The kit was made by Tetenal. It was distributed by both the Beseler enlarger company and Jobo Phototechnic with differently marked packaging for each seller.

The Beseler branded kit was about 5% cheaper. I have no idea why. I tried both kits and inside the box everything was identical except for the brand label.

This was a 3-step kit: Step 1 = developer. Step 2 = blix (bleach and fixer in a single solution), Step 3 = stabilizer. It gave perfect results on my 35mm, 120, 4” x 5”, and 8” x 10” films.

Here are the main points. I inserted a few comments in brackets.

Standard Processing Sequence

The chart for standard processing lists the proper sequence for the Beseler CN-2 process. This basic sequence should be followed for all of your processing. Because the actual development process takes place in Step 1, modification of the normal time will affect the final image.

Time changes will be required and vary depending upon processing temperature, film type and quantity of film processed. The TIME/TEMPERATURE TABLES list alternate times for Step 1. Step 2, final wash times, and timing for Step 3 are constant for a given temperature and do not vary from the standard sequence.

[What follows is for hand tank processing. Later, the instructions tell us to reduce Step 1 and Step 2 times by 10% for machine processing.]

The following are: Step, 24C time, 30C time, 38C time and Agitation

Step 1, 16:00, 8:00, 3:15, continuous for first 15 seconds, then once every 15 seconds.

Step 2, 10:00, 8:00, 6:00, continuous for first 15 seconds, then once every 15 seconds.

Wash, 7:00, 5:00, 3:00, running water or water change every 30 seconds with constant agitation.

Step 3, 1:00, 1:00, 1:00, First 5 seconds only.


Temperature tolerance for Step 1 is +/- 0.5C. All subsequent steps are +/- 4C. Step 3 temperature is 24C in all three columns above [I don’t agree with this. If the other solutions are 38C, then Step 3 should be the same to prevent the possibility of temperature-change induced reticulation]

Note: The loaded film tank should be inserted in the water bath at least 5 minutes prior to processing in order to stabilize its temperature [In my case, I always presoak the film in tempered water for a minute or two before starting processing.] Refer to the TIME/TEMPERATURE TABLES and the CAPACITY OF SOLUTIONS chart for additional information.

[The CAPACITY OF SOLUTIONS chart is set up for a one-half liter kit. Some of the film sizes are obsolete so I only give the common ones still in use.]

Capacity of Solutions

135-36, 120 = 8 rolls, 220 = 4 rolls, sheet film = 640 square inches.


Time/Temperature Tables

The standard processing sequence for C-41 type films suggests processing at 38C; however, excellent results can be obtained at any of the other temperatures listed. Lower temperatures may be more convenient to work with in some places, while the higher temperatures offer a faster processing time. Regardless of the temperature chosen, all processing solutions and wash temperatures should be the same.


For ISO 200 and Slower Films [This divides the capacity into quarters.]


Step 1 [Hand tank]


24C, First 1/4 = 16:00, Second 1/4 = 18:00, Third 1/4 = 20:00, Fourth 1/4 = 22:00

30C, First 1/4 = 8:00, Second 1/4 = 9:00, Third 1/4 = 10:00, Fourth 1/4 = 11:00

38C, First 1/4 = 3:15, Second 1/4 = 3:30, Third 1/4 = 3:45, Fourth 1/4 = 4:00



For ISO 400 and Faster Films [Only three divisions due to the greater chemical depletion of fast film]


Step 1 [Hand tank]


24C, First 1/4 = 16:00, Second 1/4 = 19:00, Third 1/4 = 21:30, NA

30C, First 1/4 = 8:00, Second 1/4 = 9:30, Third 1/4 = 11:00, NA

38C, First 1/4 = 3:15, Second 1/4 = 3:45, Third 1/4 = 4:00, NA


[Now I’ll repeat the table for ISO 200 and slower films for machine processing based on the 10% reduction for continuous agitation. Check the times because I might have made an error in calculation.]

For ISO 200 and Slower Films [This divides the capacity into quarters.]

Step 1 [Machine Processing]


24C, First 1/4 = 14:24, Second 1/4 = 16:12, Third 1/4 = 18:00, Fourth 1/4 = 19:48

30C, First 1/4 = 7:12, Second 1/4 = 8:06, Third 1/4 = 9:00, Fourth 1/4 = 9:54

38C, First 1/4 = 2:55, Second 1/4 = 3:09, Third 1/4 = 3:22, Fourth 1/4 = 3:36