I think an interesting point one of the speakers made was digital's succeptability (sp!) to file format changes. My very nerd co-workers dismiss this with a casual 'just copy it over' as if that solves everything. But how many people can even read a 5 1/4" floppy? It's not just the format but the devices to mount, copy and store. 5 1/4" floppies aren't even that old if you look at time as I was raised to look at it. People lose really important stuff all the time, even when they *know* they should make backups. (And yes, I know about that 15 year old file you have on the IBM-pc2 you have in your basement. I also know about the thousands of new disks that fail every year in Google's clusters.)

Personally I don't really care if the three Star Wars prequels go poof but what I see is a culture accepting (or being groomed to accept) all products as ever more temporary. From the now worthless digital camera dumped on Craigslist to the wireless sprinkler system rain sensor with the non-changable batteries. Things designed and built with longevity in mind are in many circles deemed old fashioned or over-built. Those are pejoratives these days. Over-built is defined of course as whatever decreases repeat sales of replacement product in the next quarter.

It's hard not to be impressed, for example, by 25M+ pixels and so forth, but the turnover rate of such things disturbs me. I like the shiny too, but it's like, as Auden said, something is trying to scratch its way into my brain. Maybe just a bad curry...